Archive for the ‘Creativity’ Category


#1 New York Times Bestselling Book Confirms What Dan Kennedy Has Said All Along

By: Dave Dee on: September 4th, 2014 1 Comment

“Purposeful story telling isn’t show business, it’s good business.”

That’s what Peter Guber says in his #1 New York Times Bestselling book, “Tell To Win”.

And it’s what Dan Kennedy has said for years: Stories sell.

Guber, an extraordinarily successful person who has had a long and varied career serving as studio chief at Columbia Pictures, co-chairman of Casablanca Records and Filmworks, CEO of Polygram Entertainment , Chairman and CEO of both Sony Pictures and Mandalay Entertainment Group substantiates that the benefits of powerful storytelling are not limited to the entertainment business.

Guber, who also oversees one of the largest combinations of professional baseball teams and venues nationwide, is the co-owner of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors, a longtime professor at UCLA, speaker at numerous business forums across the U.S., and has even invested in other businesses set out to PROVE that stories are powerful calls to action for any business.

Looking outside the entertainment industry, Guber turned to some of the most successful business leaders in America to see what their experiences were with using stories in business. And he consulted experts in psychology, narrative medicine, and organizational storytelling to determine if purposeful story telling was a success tool that many in business mistakenly ignore.

His book further supports the importance  of emotionally transporting your customers, clients, and patients via stories in order to get them to take action.

Giving examples from businesses in all different categories and walks of life—Guber cites stories from businesses such as restaurants, financial planners, eye doctors, lawyers, investors, politicians, and many more. He also shows how both story-tellers and non-story-tellers can employ stories to help them succeed.

Here are some key points I picked up from reading his book:

To be considered a story, you need surprise. Pay close attention to this one: when you give your audience exactly what they expect, with no surprise, you will bore your audience. This is NOT a story. Surprise is what makes a story and makes your story memorable.

Telling stories is a tool anyone can use. Stories aren’t reserved for the rich, the educated, the intelligent, the successful, and so on. You don’t have to have a certain education or reach a certain age or income level to tell and listen to stories or use them to win.

People are wired for stories. Think of your own experiences. From the time you are young, you are told stories. As you get older, you read story books. When you are with your friends and family—or even at the office, you tell stories.

It makes perfect sense that we are wired for stories, yet many businesses ignore this potent tool and lean towards stating facts and statistics instead. (Check out some particularly compelling research on stories verses statistics in Chapter 3, along with a super idea that a financier on Wall Street used to get more done.)

Beware of hidden time bombs. We tend to repeat our stories. Depending on the nature of your personal back stories, this repetition can produce positive or negative results. Ignore the power of your own back-story and these can surface at inopportune times.  The good news is that you can use your negative experiences in ways so that they won’t continue to affect you negatively or creep up and sabotage you unexpectedly when you least expect them to (such as when you are trying to close a big deal.)

Find the “it.” You need the thing that will emotionally transport your audience. Without this piece, your audience won’t get what your proposition is, even if it is a complete no-brainer to you, meaning people will say “no” when you fully expect them to say “yes.”

Same story. Different resolution. You may have a great story, but the wrong resolution for your audience. Know your audience well and you’ll know what they will respond to.

Also, you can use the same story with different resolutions for different audiences. For example, let’s say you have an idea for an information marketing business, but you need others to invest in your idea. You could tell the same story about your idea, but for the investor who has money to spare and loves the risk, you’d paint a picture of the big pay-out potential. While the investor who doesn’t have any money to invest, but has knowledge or skill he can invest, you’d paint a picture that involves him gaining reputation that could lead to more and better-paying clients.

One is a dangerous number. Just as Dan Kennedy has said many times, one is a dangerous number. This is no exception. Stories should be told in offline and online marketing as well as in face-to-face situations.

Of course it is impossible for me to summarize here everything you will discover about why and how to use stories in your business.  However, if you consider these tips and focus on telling stories in your business, you can make facts and figures more memorable, make your products and services resonate with your audience, and get more people to take action.

NOTE: Recently I interviewed Peter Guber, who will be our celebrity guest speaker at this year’s Info-Summit. This is a GREAT interview. PACKED with wisdom, you’ll be surprised at how many golden nuggets you pull out of this in the short time it will take you to listen to it.

You can find Peter’s full interview with me by clicking here. During the interview you’ll discover:

  • How to rescue yourself after failure.
  • What Guber learned about credentials that will help you be more successful.
  • What gives Guber the most satisfaction out of all of his accomplishments and why he feels his education began when he left school.
  • How to deal with continual change.
  • Guber’s personal mantra and how this will help you be authentic.
  • How to remain risk-adverse.
  • And lots more besides.

Listen to Peter Guber’s interview here.

P.P.S. Today is the FINAL DAY for you to receive a discount and save up to $1,297. Rates will increase tomorrow. For more information or to register now, visit www.gkic.com/is2014 NOW

5 Tips For Selling More Of Your Product or Service Using Stories

By: Dave Dee on: July 8th, 2014 1 Comment

“If you can’t tell it, you can’t sell it.”

So says Peter Guber.

Guber is Founder and CEO of Mandalay Entertainment, a business dynamo that spans movies, TV, sports entertainment and digital media.

And I agree!

Guber’s hit films include Batman, Soul Surfer, and Rain Man. He also owns the NBA Golden State Warriors franchise and is co-owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers. He also appears on TV as the weekly entertainment and media analyst for Fox Business News, to name but a few of his accomplishments.

How does one person accomplish so much? Peter Guber says he has long relied on purposeful storytelling to motivate, win over, shape, engage, and sell.

He also says that what started as a knack for telling stories in the entertainment industry spilled over and evolved into a set of principles to achieve other goals.

This isn’t the first you’ve heard of the importance of storytelling. Dan Kennedy has long championed the idea that “stories sell.” They can help you capture your customer’s attention and sell your existing products and services better. They can build your reputation. They can engage your customers and turn them into loyal, raving fans. And much more.

And one more way to look at stories—they can serve as your inspiration for a product you create to sell.

Let me show you what I mean.

Here at GKIC, when we hear the same questions over and over from people about a particular topic, we know there is interest in that topic.

For example one area we get a lot of questions about is how to write persuasive copy that sells.

Why do we get a lot of questions about that? Because we have a story to tell about it. (Namely that Dan Kennedy, myself and our team of GKIC copywriters have all created persuasive copy that has sold millions and millions and millions of dollars’ worth of products and services.) This makes our story more valuable.

Therefore, knowing we have a valuable story to tell becomes the inspiration to create an information product to sell.

Here are five tips for finding your story that sells:

1)      Assess. What are the stories you tell over and over again? Do people always ask you about how you get so many customers? Or how you got your start in the business? Or how you are able to raise ten kids and stay sane?

If you are asked the same questions over and over, then chances are people are curious about how you did something and this could be a good indication of “your story” that will sell.

2)      Ask questions and dig deep. Often times, you have a GREAT story, you just don’t know it. Because it’s your life, it may seem boring or irrelevant, but to others, it’s “the” thing that hooks them.

This is frequently revealed when you dig deep and look for a “story behind the story”—much like the greatest journalists of our time do. Journalists find stories by using this technique and accomplish it by asking a lot of questions and assembling facts. In doing this, they often uncover the most intriguing nuggets and reveal the most fascinating part of the story.

What are the details of your story? Are there details you don’t tell very often (because people don’t know to ask you about them,) but when you do, they are riveted? This is the story behind the story.  Tip: You know you are on to something when revealing some details spawn many more questions.

This can also be the most painful part of your life. A great place to look for examples of this are in weight loss stories or rags to riches stories—where the writer describes in great detail hitting rock bottom and the secret that brought them huge success.

3)      Ask what big problems you have solved. Do you have a great story about how you solved a big or common problem? If you have more than one, select the story that best solves the problem and/or choose the problem you can best solve in relation to your prospective competition.

For example, let’s say you can solve the problem of attracting new, high quality customers and you can solve the problem of closing the sale. You are really good at both, however your competition is only good at attracting new customers. In this case, you might want to focus on your story of how you can help people close the sale better.

4)      Make a list of what makes you feel happy, strong and energized. When you find what makes you feel the most energized, often therein lies your story. You’ll discover not only the thing you are best at, but in relaying your story, you will have more enthusiasm which often translates to making more sales.

5)      Ask your closest friends and most trusted business associates what they think your best at.  If you still can’t figure out what your story is and how to turn that into a product, ask your most trusted advisors and business associates for feedback. Ask them their opinion of what you have to offer that is unique and what they think you do best. Ask them for stories or examples where they witnessed you at your best.

So my final question is—What’s YOUR story? Like Peter Guber and Dan Kennedy –when you find that, you’ll most likely discover an information marketing product (or two or three…) that is worth creating.

NOTE: If you want to hear more about how Peter Guber’s set of principles that anyone can use to tell stories to accomplish their goals, then you won’t want to miss Info-SUMMIT.  Not only will you get the chance to meet Peter in person and get your picture taken with him, but you’ll also be there when he reveals his techniques for:

  • Capturing your customer’s attention first, fast and foremost
  • Building your tell around “what’s in it for them”
  • How to create purposeful stories that can serve as powerful calls to action for your business and products.

For more information or to reserve your seat, visit www.gkic.com/infosummit. But hurry—your chance to save up to $1900 is running out and seats are limited.

The Magic Secret Used By TOP Advertising Strategists To Lift Response Far Above Ordinary

By: Dave Dee on: May 10th, 2014 1 Comment

During my days as a magician I learned a key secret that I still use in business today.

It was essential in, not only putting on an entertaining show, but in getting clients to book me, pay me well and refer me to others.

In fact, it helped me book far more shows than other magicians which had been practicing magic much, much longer than I had.

It’s a secret that the TOP and I mean the very top advertising strategists and copywriters use to lift their response far above the ordinary.

And yet, it’s a secret that most business people ignore.

What is this secret?

Making people believe.

Dan Kennedy says, “The secret behind every extraordinarily successful promoter, marketer, entrepreneur and the fortunes built by them, as well as most other institutions of size and scope, and behind the successful popularizing of anything is making people believe.”

Take Disney. They have an entire “Imagineering” department that is devoted to developing things to make people believe that Disney is the most ‘magical’ and ‘happiest’ place on earth.  One of the goals of this department is to deliver experiences that their audience will not find anywhere else.

A more obvious example comes from recording artist Justin Bieber with his constant message of “Believe.” Based on his unlikely rise to fame by way of YouTube, he’s built a fan base around the idea that anything can happen.

So how do you make people believe? Here are a few ways you can increase your own believability:

1)      Make yourself famous. Harry Houdini is arguably one of the most famous magicians. He was great at self-promotion. One of the ways he would generate publicity for his performances was to strip completely naked and get voluntarily thrown in jail. He’d then escape from the jail cell.  Two other examples of people who make people believe in what they say in part because they’re famous are Dr. Oz and financial advisor Suze Orman.

2)      Be confident. People are much more likely to believe someone who is confident than someone who is unsure of themselves. Rehearsing what you will say and how you will respond to questions from clients will make you appear more confident. (Darcy shared another way to boost your confidence level in The Two Reasons Why People Struggle Or Stall—And How To Get Unstuck[C1] .)

3)      Be fascinating. Last year at SuperConference, Sally Hogshead discussed how you could use your “fascination” to increase fees for your products and services. She pointed out that when all things are equal, whichever thing, person, product, business, service, etc. is the most fascinating will always win. (For more on how to use fascination to your advantage, read my article, “Yes, you’re fascinating, but are you using it to your advantage?”

To be successful at selling your product or service, people must believe in it and you. Determine what you can do today to start making your customers, clients or patients believe in both you and what you have to offer.

NOTE:  If you want to discover the principles for making people believe and getting this secret to work in your business so you can fuel your business and lift your response WAY up, then check out this special message from Dan Kennedy.  In it he’s also offering a bonus that’s unavailable anywhere else.  Click here to find out more.

The Unsung Causes Of Failure In Small Business

By: Darcy Juarez on: May 6th, 2014 5 Comments

I just finished re-reading Making Them Believe by Dan Kennedy and Chip Kessler.

Based on the advertising, marketing and promotions of Dr. John Brinkley, it dissects the 21 principles drawn from Dr. Brinkley’s advertising.

At one point in the book, Dan Kennedy discusses the Dr. Brinkley idea that impresses him the most. He says it’s impressive because it is very common to find entrepreneurs doing just the opposite.

In fact, since the beginning of Dan’s consulting business forty years ago, he’s witnessed business owners spending sizable sums of money and expending enormous effort on marketing while giving little or no regard to this principle. Which often causes struggle, frustration, and may exact great penalties on a business—even failure.

So what was John Brinkley so good at that earned Dan Kennedy’s admiration?

His laser focus on developing a clearly defined target audience and a clearly developed message.

Dan says business owners, “Either begin and grow without focus, or lose focus and drift away from what brought them to the dance over time.”

Dr. Brinkley on the other hand, from start to finish, maintained very clear focus.

When reviewing this I thought a great deal about the reasons behind why so many business owners are unfocused or drift from their original target.

One reason is that focusing on a small target seems contrarian. On the surface it would seem that if you had a larger audience to choose from, you would sell more.

But actually the opposite is true.

A focused target audience matters more than the size of that audience. In other words, you don’t need millions of customers to grow your business; you just need enough of the right ones.

Brinkley was very clear about who he was targeting and why they were his ideal customers.

In fact, he tossed aside enormous segments of the population such as women who, at the time, purchased 80% of medicines and medical treatments.

Instead he consistently focused on a single segment of the population which was age and gender specific, and within that, ailment/condition specific, and within that mind-set specific.  And he never strayed away from that segment.

When you target everyone or even a broad segment of the population, you’ll find people simply aren’t going to respond. That’s because your one-size-fits all message can’t compete with the messages which speak specifically to them.

Another reason for lack of focus is that it is easy to be led astray.

A media sales person offers you a deal so you take it, despite the fact the target audience is a poor match for your business. Or you hear about a hot trend in media and think you must get onboard right away.

Once defined, stick to your target. Don’t let economics, media sales persons, hot trends, and other distractions steer you off target. If your target market isn’t looking at that media, it’s not right for you and can cost you far more than money.

Direct your marketing efforts to a very, specific, very focused target market—and avoid drifting away from that target—and you will waste less and profit more.

It’s not just an unfocused target audience that can lead to failure. Your message must be on point too—and you must continue to consistently convey that proposition.

Clarity of a specific proposition trumps general propositions. People aren’t listening to generalities. Get rid of vanilla messaging in favor of a specific, specialized message that is clearly focused on what your defined, specific target wants.

Brinkley built a single specialty and crafted a very single-minded, specific proposition that he stuck with throughout a lot of controversy, opposition, and criticism. He never strayed from his proposition, not once.

Dan Kennedy says, “This is something most business people cannot seem to do.” Many are swayed by the opinions of others or by criticism they hear.

He encourages you to not be swayed by critics and continues, “I have, for example, never once gone and read any of the criticism and gossip about me…I couldn’t be less interested in it because I am convinced the sources of it are not my good customers or candidates to be good customers.”

Expend your energy on those who will be good customers. When you continually focus on a single message, you will develop passionate audiences who will even help spread your message for you because of the nature of people who share through social media.

Benjamin Franklin once said, “Never confuse motion with action.”  While you may have a message you are actively spreading, ask yourself, is it targeted and focused on a single audience and message? In today’s world, a vanilla, one-size fits all message targeting a generalized audience will not be heard. Which means the motion you are taking may not always be worthwhile.

NOTE: If you want fewer struggles and faster, cheaper, non-boring marketing that attracts only your ideal clients, customers or patients that like and respect you then don’t miss our next Fast Implementation Bootcamp on May 29-30, 2014. You’ll leave knowing how to:

  • Attract your ideal client (while repelling the ones you don’t like and who don’t respect you.)
  • Craft a compelling, specific message that is irresistible to your target audience.
  • Create a lead generation magnet that is positioned to lead that perfect customer to beat a path to your door.
  • Do the #1 thing that your business must do to not only survive but to be successful.
  • And much, much more.

If you’ve struggled with determining who your exact target market should be, don’t feel your message is focused enough or find that you are not where you want to be in your business, then it’s time for you to attend GKIC’s Fast Implementation Bootcamp.

We’ll get you focused and on-track. Plus if you are a member, it’s FREE to attend.  If you’re not a member, you can take our 60 day trial membership now (with no commitment) and come for free as well.  Just click here now to discover what all you receive with the 60 day trial.

Three Things That Create Breakthroughs & Quantum Leaps In Small Business

By: Dan Kennedy on: April 29th, 2014 1 Comment

To be clear, I am generally opposed to pioneering.

My “oft-used chestnut” about pioneering is: pioneers return home full of arrows. I am greatly in favor of ‘creative borrowing’—the transfer of the proven from one place to an entirely different place, where it is as revolutionary as it may have been common in the place where I found it.

However, often times I find business owners self-sabotage by adhering to commonplace mindsets. This comes from insisting on only drawing from or receiving inspiration from peer-examples in your exact same line of work.

It confines you in a small prison of your own making, virtually prohibiting any particular breakthroughs, or a deeper understanding of universal, moveable, translatable principles that explain success, mediocrity or failure, prominence or oblivion in all fields.

I do all I can to push people past such self-imprisonment. I demand my clients, students, readers look outside their particular business or profession.

Any fool can find reasons something found, observed or shown to him does not apply and can’t be used. This is a way of escaping difficult thinking and avoiding work.  It’s also an excellent way of avoiding wealth.  Anyone can do this, and most do.

The cliché “think outside the box” came about because most business owners do, in fact, lock themselves into a very small, rigidly constructed box, and are loathe considering anything that might drag them out of the security of their precious, treasured little box.

This, incidentally, is how once mighty industry leaders lose their grip, slip down the mountain and sometimes disappear altogether.

For example, you may have witnessed the decline of Howard Johnson Hotels. Or think about restaurants in your area that, once popular, are now closed. In sports, harness racing—at one time more popular in America than Major League Baseball—is now a shadow of its former self and virtually unknown to many citizens.

This is also what prevents the small from getting big.

Everybody is guilty of it at times, to a degree. Everybody. I doubt it’s completely preventable or avoidable.

The trick is to not become consistently guilty of it.

And, if you want breakthroughs and quantum leaps, you will need to do some uncomfortable things. Among them these three:

Be an explorer. Venture outside of the norms of your industry and away from your territory, to distant and foreign places, to find and bring back strange ideas, and then translate them to work in your business. You’ll see examples of this in No B.S. Direct Marketing for Non-Direct Marketing Businesses. For instance, Chet Rowland, owner and president of Chet’s Pest Control, began applying direct marketing strategies he found in the GKIC No B.S. Marketing Letter that nobody in pest control was using. He went from struggling to the top 1% in his industry.

Be a bomb-thrower. Do something to completely shake things up so you can start anew. A few years ago, founder and CEO of 1-800-Flowers, Jim McCann described one of his roles in his company was to be a “bomb-thrower.” He said he needed to be a disruptive force willing to blow things up and start over in order to make things better. When he started working in the floral industry, nobody had, as he puts it, “McDonald-ized” the flower business. Nobody had grown a big company in the flower industry. McCann was the one to shake things up. He was one of the first retailers to use a 24/7 toll-free number and the internet for direct sales to consumers. He was one of the first to partner with AOL. He put systems in place so that customers could expect the same great experience whether over the phone, online or in a local shop. And he grew from one location to over 125 (and growing) locations today.

Be daring. Not quite reckless, but daring. Little comes from playing it safe all the time. Big comes from risk. If not financial, then risk of reputation, image, respect, or ego. Risk of embarrassment, criticism or confrontation.

Target was just another discount retailer competing with Wal-Mart and K-Mart before they took the risk of positioning themselves as a retailer above these competitors. Teaming up with big-name designers to offer affordable versions of their designer merchandise was daring and paid off.

The smaller the circumference of the circle you draw around yourself and your business, the more willing you are to pay attention only to things within that circle while refusing to consider anything outside of it…the less there is to explore, the less material there is to make bombs with, and the more cautious and timid you will be.

More often than not, the greatest profits have come from adaptations and adaptive uses of things, not from the inventions of the pioneer.

NOTE:  If you are ready to give up being a pioneer and want to break out of your imprisonment, a consistently reliable source for ‘creative borrowing’ that will help you make breakthroughs and quantum leaps in your business, be sure to spend time every month reading No B.S. Marketing Letter. Not yet a member? Get two months membership plus $633.91worth of money-making information FREE by visiting here.

Already a member but want to take your business to a new level? Have you signed up for our FREE Fast Implementation Bootcamp yet?

For more information, or to sign up visit: http://www.gkic.com/bootcamp

8 Tips For Maximizing Referrals In Your Business Or Professional Practice

By: Darcy Juarez on: February 20th, 2014 No Comments

In your February 2014 No B.S. Marketing Letter (available by clicking here for members, FREE Trial For Non-Members), I mentioned that my family couldn’t stop talking about how nice the people from Cambria (the producer of custom counter tops we ordered) were.

While I was giving you an example of Outrageous Advertising, I think it’s important to note that my family and I don’t tend to talk about products or service that just meets our expectations. We only talk about the kind that either fails to meet or significantly exceeds our expectations.

As I said, my family told no less than 15 people within 10 days of their experience with Cambria. Had Cambria not gone the extra mile and had they just received adequate or good customer service, they probably wouldn’t have told anyone about Cambria.

What about you? When do you talk about businesses or professional services?

If you’re like most people, it’s only when customer service dramatically impresses or exceeds your expectations that you begin to create word-of-mouth advertising and referrals.

Conversely, service has to be really bad before you starting warning people to avoid a company at all costs.

The thing is, often it only takes one or two “little touches” to create exceptional service.

Some examples, the Omni Hotel in downtown Chicago is known for their extra touches. For instance, a guests travelling with young children receives a rolling backpack filled with toys, books and fun things to do for their kids upon arrival and milk and cookies at bedtime.  The doorman knows guests’ names, high-fives kids as they come in and goes the extra mile to get guests what they need.

Not too long ago, a friend of mine had her car serviced by Toyota. She needed her headlight changed which unexpectedly ended up being a rather pricey repair due to the labor involved to replace it. Her service handler found additional items that needed repaired and did them for her at no charge, had her car washed and vacuumed and gave what she described as “extra attention to every detail.”  Despite the unexpected hefty price tag, she was much more focused on the great service she had—going so far to say that it was the best service experience she’d ever had at a car dealer.

The little things that Omni and Toyota do set them apart from competitors and encourage people to talk about them—which creates referrals.

Dan Kennedy suggests you adapt the idea of doing “little things” in your own business. These little things can make a big difference in your word-of-mouth advertising and referral campaign—and ultimately in your bottom line.  Here are some tips for getting the most out of this idea:

  • Become a serious student of word-of-mouth advertising. Look for the “little things” other businesses do that make you want to talk about them and note when people tell you about positive experiences they’ve had. Is it something you can adapt to your business?
  • Define your customers’ expectations and set up a plan to exceed those expectations. Create a list of what your customer expects, then continually amend and add to that list as your understanding of your customers grow.
  • Rate your business or professional practice on your workplace environment. Dan Kennedy suggests you rate your environment on the five senses: sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste.

Are there things you could do to improve any of these that would create a better environment that might get people talking about you?

For example, an eye doctor created a “kid zone” separate from his regular waiting room complete with kid movies, a video game, kid books and games.  A dental practice offers earphones to their patients so they can listen to music and block out the sound of the drill while the dentist is working on their teeth. A hairdresser offers an assortment of drinks including wine, specialty coffees and teas, and always has a plate of cookies out for their clients.

  • Continually look for new ways to exceed customer expectations. Create a suggestion box and ask employees for ideas. Try new ideas to see if they elicit a reaction from your customers and get them talking about you. Always look for ways to adapt ideas you observe other businesses doing.
  • Implement the “little things idea” program. Ask each employee to do one “little thing” that goes above and beyond your customers’ expectations in order to exceed them.
  • Ask your customers. Use surveys, questionnaires, conversation, etc. to ask your customers about what they need, want, like and don’t like. Make improvements based on the feedback you receive.
  • Measure the success of your word-of-mouth advertising. Keep track of the total number of referrals you get and the percentage of your customers who give you referrals.

Walt Disney said, “Do what you do so well that people can’t resist telling others about you.” When you look for ways to make your customer service stand out—chances are you’ll instantly increase your word-of-mouth advertising and referrals. What “little things” do you do in your business or professional practice? What ideas can you “borrow” from other businesses? Share your ideas in the comments.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

The Olympic Formula Of A GKIC Champion

By: Dave Dee on: February 13th, 2014 3 Comments

With the Winter Olympics underway, there are a lot of stories about how different athletes made their way to this prestigious event.

Some stories have to do with overcoming challenges.

And some are, well a bit more unusual…

Such as Tonga luger Bruno Banani who, in exchange for having his training paid for, agreed to change his name to that of a Germany company that makes underpants. He is now a walking advertisement for a brand of long johns.  (His given name is Fuahea Semi.)

The point is that people do all sorts of things in pursuit of success. And like the Olympics, in any business, there is rarely one answer, solution or stopgap measure that can make a big change in your business or lead to success.

It’s more likely that you’ll need a variety of strategies to come out on top.

From Olympic athletes to GKIC elite, here are the elements that will help you pave your way to the winner’s podium:

Take massive action: It’s never one thing that leads to success. Sure Fuahea changed his name in order to get training, but it took a lot more than that to make it to the Olympics. He had to completely learn the sport starting when he was 20.  Most of his competition had been practicing since they were kids. He had to train for hours every day, work with a top trainer and do special exercises to improve his technique. Like Banani, you’ll need to take massive action and do dozens of things simultaneously.

Confidently take bold action. It’s not just athletes that need confidence to compete and win. Look at any successful person, and you’ll find they are confident. You have to believe that the actions you are taking will help you succeed. And you need to stay confident when something doesn’t go as planned.

Focus on results. Dan Kennedy says, “Ordinary people are process-focused and task-focused, but exceptional success comes from being results-focused.”  Athletes look for how to shave another second off, not at what it takes to do that. Instead of getting bogged down in the details, condition yourself to focus on how to get the best results.

Create a project team. The bid committee that submits a proposal to host the Olympics could never pull off their vision on their own. And while your vision might not be anywhere near as massive as the Olympics, you don’t need to do everything yourself, nor do you need to hire permanent employees. Assemble a team of freelancers to complete projects for you.  This way you pay only for the time and services you require.

Put systems in place. If you watch speed skaters, they seem to all follow the same systematic approach. The way they shift their weight and synchronize their arm swings. One of the biggest shortcuts you can take is to put proven step-by-step systems into place that allow you to plug into a winning formula instead of having to spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to do something.  Plus, once it’s in place, you can really focus on how to tweak things to improve your results.

Get a coach. Have you ever heard of an athlete making it to the Olympics without a coach?  Neither have I. If you want to get to the top, you need to engage in coaching that will help you get there. If you aren’t ready financially to hire a coach, look for every opportunity to get coaching such as our free webinars, teleseminars and FREE Fast Implementation Bootcamp.

Find your inspiration. Athletes are often asked who inspired them. For instance, Olympic snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis says her inspiration was Olympian Picabo Street. Success stories have the power to inspire and move people to be their best. Find a business success story that inspires you. One way to do this is to read about or listen to GKIC members who’ve experienced success. You’ll find their stories inside our newsletters, during monthly calls, and at events. You might even find a story by just speaking with people one-on-one at our live events. This instills confidence that “if they can do it, so can you.”

Participate with the best. Vanessa Mae (competing under the name Vanessa Vanakorn) is actually a world-famous violinist who is competing as a skier representing Thailand. She says she is at the Olympics to participate with the best. Participating in events where you are surrounded by entrepreneurs achieving great things can truly create magic. It not only inspires you, but I’ve seen many people raise their business to incredible new levels they never dreamed possible—and they credit it to that “magic something” that happens when you are surrounded by the best. (You have two BIG opportunities every year to participate with the best at Info-SUMMIT℠ and Super Conference℠.)

If you want to stand among the GKIC elite who are business champions, then put these elements into play as soon as possible and sooner than you can imagine, you’ll be alongside them on the winner’s podium.

NOTE:  If you are looking for the #1 path that the most successful GKIC members have taken to reach new levels of success FAST,  then you’ll want to attend GKIC’s FREE Fast Implementation Bootcamp. Over the past two years, it has consistently delivered top results.

In just 48 hours, you’ll discover the most valuable GKIC money-making systems, tools and strategies that transform lives and build top incomes.

You’ll leave confident knowing that you are implementing the right strategies when you attend our next Fast Implementation Bootcamp…FREE. Get more information and register by clicking here or go to www.gkic.com/bootcamp

A Better Way To Win: 5 Entrepreneur Do-overs Inspired by the “Seahawk Experiment”

By: Dave Dee on: January 23rd, 2014 1 Comment

After 17 weeks of NFL regular-season games and three rounds of playoff games, the best teams have emerged for the Super Bowl—the Seattle Seahawks being one of them.

And I can’t help but wonder if their success has to do with the experiment that’s been taking place.

You see Seahawks Head Coach Pete Carroll is doing things a bit differently.

Inspired by a previous failing, being fired in 1999 as head coach for the New England Patriots, this new approach is based on a “do-over” list Carroll made while rebuilding his reputation as a college coach.

In part, this experiment revolves around player characteristics and the challenges they face.

Interestingly, I noticed that entrepreneurs exhibit similar characteristics and face similar problems.  For example, NFL players are highly competitive. They often feel isolated and alone—and need someone to talk to.  Their health and sleep can be affected—and as a result their mental well-being can suffer.

Similarly entrepreneurs often want to be the best at what they do; feel isolated and alone; and face sleep deprivation worrying about their business, often neglecting their health in exchange for reaching success.

The thing is… it doesn’t have to be that way. Seeing these similarities, Carroll’s list inspired my own entrepreneur “do-over” list.

1)      Make time to interact with successful entrepreneurs. Being an entrepreneur can feel lonely at times. Even though you may have a lot of friends and family, working in isolation, along with friends and family  often not understanding what you are going through, can make you feel alone.

Interacting with highly successful entrepreneurs who are living the lifestyle you want helps remove that lonely feeling. This gives you someone to talk to who “gets it” and can inspire and motivate you.

Don’t know where to meet successful entrepreneurs? Traveling to conferences and/or joining mastermind groups are two of the best ways to meet the right people. No matter what your plan is though, do whatever it takes to get time interacting with other entrepreneurs. Also, you’ll get more out of face-to-face interactions and phone conversations because you’re more likely to establish a solid connection that will grow.

Tip: GKIC is full of like-minded entrepreneurs and a great community for meeting successful entrepreneurs. You’ll find our most successful and wealthiest entrepreneurs at our semi-annual events, Super Conference℠ and Info-SUMMIT℠ and as members of our coaching and mastermind groups. You can also connect with entrepreneurs at GKIC Chapter meetings and on our GKIC members’ only social site.  (Not yet a member? Receive 2 months free membership and $633.91 worth of moneymaking information here.)

2)      Do whatever it takes to put systems in place that automate your business. If you don’t have reliable systems in place that will give you predictable results, you will always be running yourself ragged.  Systems that automate your business allows you to work less and earn more, allowing you to live life on your terms while giving you time to take care of yourself.

Tip: Tap into the systems and resources GKIC uses to automate our business at our annual events, Super Conference℠ and Info-SUMMIT℠. Not only will you have a chance to personally see live demonstrations of the systems that are working best, but you’ll have an opportunity to speak to representatives from the companies we use so you can determine which ones are the right fit for you. This is also THE place to get the best deals, free resources and save a bundle.

3)      Take care of your health. It won’t matter if you reach your business goals if you’re not healthy enough to enjoy the freedom and wealth you’ve created. Plus sleep deprivation, unhealthy eating and lack of exercise are not the best formula for breakthrough thinking.

Tip: Avoid “entrepreneur overload” by taking short daily breaks. Breaks might include some exercise or relaxing with a good book. This can be just what you need to improve productivity, come up with new ideas and can actually be the solution for giving you more time in your day.

4)      Do better than you’ve ever done before. Anthony Robbins said,“Do what you’ve always done and you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.” You don’t have to improve everything in your business all at once, however, you should pick something you will do better this year such as getting more customers or increasing the lifetime value of your customer. No matter what you choose, pick something measurable that you will do better at.

Tip: Once you’ve picked what you want to get better at, don’t reinvent the wheel. Find a proven model to emulate and use that as your guide.  Don’t be afraid to ask other successful entrepreneurs what they would recommend.

Bonus tip: Take the time to learn techniques that will help you tap into your full potential such as speed reading. Being able to learn faster and retain information better can help you achieve your goal while freeing up your time.

5)      Keep up on business trends. Don’t assume or think you know it all.

Just because something is working well today, does not necessarily mean it will continue being effective. Not knowing what is going on can cause you to fail.

By keeping informed of what is working, what’s not working and business climate changes that can affect your business, you can avoid engaging in something that is no longer working and/or make changes to your business to keep ahead of the curve.

Tip: Don’t copy what other businesses in your niche are doing, unless you have proof that what they are doing gets results. Learn by finding out what the top 1% are doing.

Learn from these “do-over” tips to get better, bigger and faster results and avoid the inevitable failure that is linked to ignoring them. I’d love to hear what would be on your “do-over” list. Please leave a comment about what you’ve do differently now than when you started.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

8 Ways To Make Your Product Or Service Stand Out From The Competition

By: Darcy Juarez on: January 16th, 2014 6 Comments

It turned the worst and last, little no-name hotel in Las Vegas into one of the largest and most successful hotels on the strip.

And it’s one of my favorite Dan Kennedy marketing stories (as related in Dan Kennedy’s Magnetic Marketing program.)

You see the owner didn’t have a tremendous amount of money to do advertising at the time so he couldn’t compete with the larger hotels that used billboards, television and full page ads in magazines.

Instead he created an offer that turned his hotel and casino into a very specific, stand-out destination that got people clamoring to go.

Here is what his offer said:

“Give me $396. I’ll give you two nights, three days in my hotel in one of the deluxe suites. There’ll be a bottle of champagne waiting for you when you arrive. You can have unlimited drinks the entire time you are here, whether you are gambling or not, even if you’re sitting in one of the lounges and enjoying the entertainment, you pay nothing more for your drinks. Most importantly, for your $396, I’m going to give you $600 of my dollars to gamble with in my casino.”

The (obvious) lesson to be learned?

Turn your ordinary offer into an extraordinary one and your product or service becomes completely new and different than your competition. This is especially important if your product or service is a commodity.

You can transform your standard ho-hum offer into a killer offer using some of the following elements:

Develop high perceived value. Create a perceived value for your product or service that is higher than the price you are charging and you make your offer irresistible. In the casino hotel offer, the $600 dollars for gambling alone makes the perceived value higher.

Reduce their risk. When you make risk-free offers, it demonstrates confidence in your product or service and makes people feel more comfortable about choosing you over a competitor who doesn’t make a no-risk offer.

  1. Money back guarantee. People often worry about the “what ifs” –what if I don’t use this, what if I don’t like it, what if it doesn’t do what it promises to do. Give people the confidence to buy your product or service by offering a “no questions asked” full refund.
  2. Generous trial periods. Offer a “try before you buy” period, such as “Try it free for 21 days.”
  3. Low-cost trial periods. Ease the fear of making a large investment by giving a trial for an expensive program or membership for a small fee. “Normally $275 per month, you can try it for 7 days for just $1.00.” (The added advantage for you is that you now have their credit card information which makes it easy to automatically charge their card full membership pricing at the end of the trial.)

Create urgency. Everyone needs an incentive to “hurry up” and order now rather than put it off until later. Five ways to nudge people in your offer are to present:

  1. A limited quantity. If you truly have a limited quantity, you can say, “Only for the first 250 orders.” If you don’t have a limited quantity you can say something like, “Your check will be returned if supplies run out.”
  2. A special combination. Create a combination offer that will expire such as, “Buy two get one free” or a special bundle or package at a discounted rate over buying them individually.
  3. A price increase. Say in order to lock in the lower price, the prospect must act now.
  4. An introductory rate or bargain. Offer a pre-publication rate or an introductory rate and explain that after so many are sold the price will increase.
  5. A limited time opportunity. Let prospects know that only a certain number of widgets are available per region. For instance, a company selling franchise opportunity might only offer one franchise location per every 100 mile radius.

Include a powerful image. The casino hotel offer outlined earlier paints a powerful picture through the story-like wording. Another way to create a powerful impact is by including a powerful picture to help tell the story. You’ll see effective examples of this in ads for restaurants, retailers, travel and charitable organizations where a picture can evoke strong emotion.

Never assume that you’ve made the sale or use a weak close that gently “urges” your prospect to act. You must tell your prospect in clear, simple language what you want him to do and give him a great reason to act immediately. When you add some or all of the elements listed, you’ll create an offer that not only does that, but that stands out and makes your product, service or company completely different from everything else out there.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

Three Ways To Show Up Like No One Else

By: Darcy Juarez on: November 12th, 2013 5 Comments

This past weekend at Info-SUMMIT, marketers’ extraordinaire Jimmy Vee and Travis Miller walked on stage in matching three piece suits with pink bow ties. (Check it out…click here)

There was no question that they stood out and made a memorable impression.

As marketers, getting attention…standing out…making a lasting impression…are all things we must strive to do.

In fact, that was a common theme throughout the weekend—how to grab eyeballs in an ever-increasing distraction ridden world.

During a surprise extra presentation, internet marketing guru Frank Kern went so far to say that it was among the biggest challenges businesses are facing today. He said there is unprecedented competition that is taking away attention, making the act of “getting attention” harder and harder to do.

Dan Kennedy stressed that the clutter and competition of free content is one of the chief problems we must combat.

Here are three methods I gained from Info-SUMMIT that you can tap into to make sure you are combating competition…methods that you most likely aren’t using now and may not even be aware exist.

Improve your voice. Influence and Vocal Coach to the stars, Roger Love taught us that when it comes to standing out as believable and influencing your market, 38% of your success has to do with the tonality of your voice.

In fact, if you’re not careful, your voice could be causing people to tune out or miss the most important parts of your message. Roger gave us example after example of how this occurs such as speaking in a monotone voice or using the wrong voice inflections on key words. This isn’t just for speakers either—it’s for EVERY business owner. Here are some places your voice could be  blending in causing you to lose customers and sales:

  • Your recorded voice message.
  • During face to face meetings with clients, customers, and patient or on the phone.
  • When you make a presentation—whether speaking live or on a teleseminar, webinar, Google+ Hangout, etc.

To set yourself apart, he says you should work on the pitch, pace, melody, tone and volume of your voice so you can create emotion in the right places, make your message more believable and make sure no one misses the most important points that you want to get across.

Use the right E-factors. During Dan Kennedy’s 7 Secrets of Mind Control Copy presentation, he said it is easier to catch attention and motivate your audience to take action when you use the correct emotional factors (You can find all of the E-Factors as Dan calls them listed in Dan Kennedy’s book, Marketing to the Affluent.) Customers buy products not so much for the features and benefits, but because of emotional reasons. For example, if you were targeting someone overweight, a headline that says, “Lose 20 Pounds In One Month Without Changing Your Diet or Exercise Routine” may grab attention better than a message that says, “Do these 7 simple exercises to lose weight.” While the second is more logical, the first hits an emotional factor better because the reader desperately hopes it’s possible and wants it to be true.

Another example is in purchasing the latest technology such as the newest model of an iPhone. Logically it doesn’t make sense to be the first one to buy because you pay the highest possible price. But using E-Factors, Apple pushes the hot buttons that create frenzy for people to want to buy it immediately and pay a higher price for doing so.

Be bigger than life. Jimmy Vee and Travis Miller from Gravitational Marketing showed a variety of different, interesting and fun ways they get attention during their presentation of their entire 30 step business plan.

They said you have to showcase a “bigger than life marketing personality.” For example, they often buy covers of industry magazines and publications. They said that mostly what you see on these covers are the business owners standing in a nice suit, with nothing to distinguish them. Jimmy and Travis come up with completely different and unique looks. In one cover they  hired a make-up artist to make them look like Zombies. The headline tied in with the idea that car dealerships were dying and that they were helping resurrect them.

The truth is the market is swarming with people selling the same stuff in the same manner…and buyers are sick of it. If you want to really boost your sales, use these techniques to give you the extra edge to be noticed and create the desire to not only look at your stuff, but read it, listen to it, and buy it.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.