Archive for the ‘Information Marketing’ Category


Four steps to discover if you should be paid for something you are giving away FREE

By: Dave Dee on: October 17th, 2014 1 Comment

 “Chances are you are giving away a potential information product for free when people would gladly give you money for it.” –Dan Kennedy

Recently, I came across a rant by a well-respected, knowledgeable, and experienced professional marketer.

He was upset because people kept asking (and expecting) him to answer questions for free. When he suggested they purchase his book which contained the answers they were asking, some were offended.

He made the point that we pay for dental work, dry-cleaning, car repairs and so on, so why should his advice be any different?

He has a point.

If you go to the dentist because your gums are sore, you don’t expect the dentist to diagnose your problem for free.

If your automobile is making a funny sound, you don’t expect your mechanic to fix it for free.

If you want to remodel your kitchen, but don’t know how to do it, you don’t buy the materials and expect a contractor to come in and show you how to do it for free.

If your goal is to earn a college degree, you don’t expect to be given free tuition to gain that knowledge.

His rant was met with overwhelming support. People responded by commenting that those who want the answers for free… aren’t serious about their business … feel entitlement… and are demonstrating “employee behavior” where employees expect to be spoon-fed.  Plus on top of all that, they don’t value the information because they paid nothing for it.

There were dozens of comments. The list of people in support of paying for information that contained knowledgeable answers was long and resolute. One person made the point, “Nobody works for free.” Even when voluntary, there is usually the expectation that there will be some sort of remuneration on the back end.

So the question I have for you today is: Are you giving away answers—information—when people would (and should) gladly pay you for it?

Here are four steps to find out.

Step One: Do some easy research. Start by thinking about what people ask you or what advice you continually repeat. If you aren’t asked these questions, but suspect you have a good idea, then ask people to help identify their frustrations to see if you might have a solution for them. Below are three categories to get you started:

  • Solutions to daily frustrations in your market. Do you hear people in your field complain about things that drive them crazy for which you have an answer?

For example, do they have employee problems, a lack of customers, problems satisfying customers’ orders, problems finding good suppliers, companies luring their customers with low prices or false information? If you find yourself answering any of these questions then you may have information people want and will pay you for it.

  • Solutions to frustrations for hobbyists. People who are passionate about a hobby…golfing, cooking, knitting, gardening, traveling, playing an instrument, etc.…want ways to do these things better. They take pride in improving or want ways to enjoy their hobby more.

For example, a surefire way to stop slicing the ball when playing golf or an easy way to get rid of pests in your vegetable garden or seven sweaters you can knit in a day. Can you see how all of these would rid a hobbyist of a frustration therefore making the hobby more enjoyable?

  • Advice you repeat again and again and again. Do you have advice that you continually repeat? Such as parenting advice or how all six of your kids got through college without any debt?

If there is something you repeat to friends, family, or at functions and parties, it might be something people would pay to receive.

Step two: Investigate the market. Once you have an idea, find out more about the market. How large is it? How many potential customers do you have regionally or in each state? Are there multiple publications already being sold in that market? Are there specialties or sub-niches in this market? By investigating the market you may find there isn’t as much demand as you thought or vice-versa!

Step three: Look at history. Take a look at who else has tried to sell something to this market. Were they successful? Have other information marketers offered products to this market in the past two or three years? Are they still in business?

What about vendors that are not marketing information products but that promote themselves within this market? This is not only valuable to see what has been successful (or if it’s been successful) but can also help you identify potential partnerships.

Step four: Research competitors. Spend time researching potential competitors. Look at their websites. Read magazines that talk about them. Look for trends, economic factors, new ideas, technology or information that might impact or affect your target market.

The chances are good that you are giving away information free—right now—when you could be making money from it.

Isn’t it time you started being compensated for your knowledge and efforts?

If you want to know if you have a marketable information product, use these steps to find out before creating your information product. It will save you loads of time and money and help you discover whether or not you have a product people want. Plus you’ll find out what has worked and what hasn’t so you can avoid repeating the mistakes others have made.

**NOTE** Having and actual marketing plan that you KNOW works removes all stress, puts money in your bank account and most importantly frees you up to actually work on what really makes you money, or better yet, frees you up to do something other than work!

Dave Dee is doing a free training you can watch right now that answers the question…How do I get more customers, clients and patients?  What does marketing look like for a small business?  How do I get my business started?

To join this free webinar simply click here now and reserve your spot and start enjoying the freedom, peace-of-mind, and PROFITS that a real marketing plan gives you, virtually immediately.

How To Build An Empire When You Don’t Have Time, Money, Or Ideas

By: Dave Dee on: October 9th, 2014 7 Comments

“If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.”—Milton Berle

What stops you from creating the income and life you want? Time… Money… Ideas…?

A recent article in Southwest Magazine talks about how actor and Emmy Award-winning host and producer of the classic PBS children’s show Reading Rainbow, LeVar Burton, got what he wanted after being told “no” multiple times.

In 2009 when the network cancelled his Reading Rainbow show, Burton didn’t give up his idea. He created a Reading Rainbow app for tablets and smartphones to sell his content there.

However, frustrated that the app was only reaching a fraction of America’s children, he asked investors to kick in funds so he could stream the content to classrooms in need. Again, he was met with closed doors.

When investor funding didn’t work out, Burton turned to Kickstarter to do a crowd-funding campaign.

He also reached out to a range of networks he had cultivated during his career.

Burton destroyed the record for the most donors to a single campaign raising $5.4 million.

What’s the real lesson here? It’s that he took matters into his own hands, was persistent, and made it happen.

Where do you want to end up at the end of 2014? If you are still waiting for things to happen, then it’s time you took matters into your own hands. Whether you need time, money, or ideas…here’s how to do exactly that:

Need Time?

  • Start small. You don’t need a big grandiose scheme to get started. You can create one special report on a topic you are already familiar with, use direct response marketing to create a lead generation machine, and follow up campaign and grow your business from there.
  • Get help.  There are multiple ways to get help. You could ask someone with expertise in an area you struggle in to do a joint venture with you. For example, if you have a great idea but aren’t so great at the marketing side, you could team up with a marketing expert, get them to create the marketing and then split the profits. 

You could also turn to virtual assistants, ODesk, 99 Designs, and other online platforms which showcase freelancers offering their services.

College campuses also are a great source for help. There are eager students looking for experience they can list on their resume. Often times, students are looking for internships or do projects for free or at a very low rate just to gain the experience. For example, a graphic artist student could help with designing marketing pieces or a film student could help you film and edit videos.

If you get an intern, think beyond the exciting tasks directly related to their field, to the mundane ones you don’t need to spend time doing yourself. One friend of mine had a marketing intern that she assigned filing and research tasks to in addition to some smaller marketing projects.

Need ideas?

  • Start something on the side. Do you already have a successful business that others want to emulate? Create an info-product that breaks down your system for success and sell it alongside your existing business.
  • Clone a successful product. Recently, in our “Make Them Buy Now” training series, we talked about “stealing” copy code from successful sales letters. Similar to copy code, you can look at successful info-products and “clone” the idea. To be clear, this doesn’t mean stealing the idea. That would be unethical and illegal. However, the components of a successful product and the psychology behind it are something you can tap into to create your own product.
  • Attend Dan Kennedy’s “90,000 in 90 Days’ Fast Start for Info-Marketing ‘Virgins’ & Beginners” where Dan will give you five different plans for starting an info-marketing business. He’ll also give you his “Weekend Wealth Plan” that hands over $100,000 in net profit from six-weekends a year. (This is a one-time only event on November 5, 2014. You must be registered for Info-SUMMIT™ to attend.)

Need Money?

  • Get someone else to kick in funds. Sponsors, association partners, and others not only are willing to help pay for your business, they also are often willing to deliver customers to you.

Perhaps you have created an info-product, but don’t have the funds to launch it. Get 3rd parties to pay for your product launch.

Get corporate sponsors to pay you to customize and do a product launch to their list while you keep ownership of the product and buyer list.

Use crowdfunding to tap into people you know who already believe in you. There are over 500 online crowdfunding platforms. A study published in FORBES projects 2014 crowdfunding to exceed $1-billion; by 2020, $100-billion! Crowdfunding is also being used as a new way to market test ideas and products, and as a ‘stealth’ list-building strategy.

Don’t let the lack of opportunities, time, money, or ideas stop you from building the income and life you want. There is ALWAYS a way to make it happen. And opportunity doesn’t always come knocking. YOU have to make it happen. YOU have to build that door.

Will you start using these methods to “build your door”? If not now, when?

Share in the comments below what you’ll do this week to start making things happen in your business.

*NOTE* Time flies and November and Info-SUMMIT are FAST approaching. Whatever is stopping you—whatever “door” you need to build, we can help you there. We’ve got Robin Robins who will be showing you how to get free money even if you are a start-up. She primarily built her company this way… from zero to $7 million.

I’ll also be revealing for the first time how you can create and clone one of the most successful products I’ve ever created for GKIC.

Is it time you are looking for? You won’t want to miss Dr. Dustin Burleson’s presentation on how he built his info-marketing business on the side despite a very busy business and life!

And if you need more traffic or a list…then our Bonus Day has what you need.

We have a big deadline coming up—early registration discounts END on October 17th. “Build your door” at Info-SUMMIT and make this the year that you wipe out the obstacles in your way.

Register here now.

For more information call 1-800-871-0147 or visit our website for more detail about Info-SUMMIT!

 

“I’ve Fallen And I Can’t Get Up…”

By: Dan Kennedy on: September 21st, 2014 10 Comments

“I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!”

You probably recognize this popular catch phrase from the television commercial for Life Alert… or perhaps from the comedic punchlines that have become a part of pop culture as a result.

In fact, it’s probably one of the most recognized slogans of all time.

The original commercial for Life Alert, a personal medical-alert system, showed an elderly woman who had fallen. The woman pushes a button on the Life Alert pendant she’s wearing around her neck. Instantly connected to a 24-hour medical response team, she says, “Help, I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.”

Bad acting made the commercial the butt of many jokes, however the company probably got the last laugh as it has obviously been an effective way to sell their product for more than 24 years. They continue to run versions of that same commercial and even made the popular catch phrase a registered trademark.

Now the company is running a new version of the commercial that is very realistic.

In fact, it’s so realistic some say it is scarier than stuff they watch on TV.

The new ad shows an empty house while playing eerie music. It pans different objects and scenes inside the empty house. In the background you can hear a woman whimpering. Just outside her window, a couple plays with a dog. And then it pans to a woman lying at the bottom of the basement stairs, crying for help.  The commercial then shows a screen that says, “When You Fall and Cannot Get Up, an ACCIDENT can turn into a TRADEGY!”

So the question is –how does the same catch phrase used by the same company for more than two decades continue to be so effective at selling their product?

And how is it that it worked when in a really bad commercial as well as in the new very realistic, very well scripted and produced one?

This seems contradictory.

Especially when you think about how bad the original commercial was.

As I alluded to above, the original commercial has been ridiculed, insulted, and referenced many times over by comedians.

The new one on the complete opposite end of the spectrum has been called disturbing and too believable.

The reason this phrase works so well—whether the ad is well scripted, acted and produced or not, is that the premise—“I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” is a real fear.

Elderly people fear losing their independence.

Family members of elderly parents fear something will happen to their loved one, with no phone nearby, and no one to hear their cries for help.

In other words, it taps into a fear that already exists.

There is no need to convince someone that this is a possibility. No need to go into a lengthy or even a real story about it happening to someone. People already know this possibility exists.

I’m going to say that again, because this is a HUGE key to a successful ad.

Tap into an emotion—a storyline that is already running inside your prospect’s head.

Although fear is certainly a popular emotion you’ve seen in ads such as the anti-smoking commercials or political campaigns, there are many other emotions and storylines that you can tap into as well.

For example, online dating services tap into the “happily ever after” story that already exists in people’s heads.

Car commercials often tap into the idea of having something that everyone else wants, but is uniquely yours.

There is always an emotional storyline that is playing in your prospect’s head. The key is to figure out what that emotional storyline is (hint: there might be more than one) and then engage your prospect with words that tap into it. When you do, that’s when you’ll make the sale.

NOTE: If you aren’t tapping into your prospect or customers emotions, then you probably aren’t making the sale either. Want to know more about which emotions to tap into and exactly how to do it? Find out the techniques Dan Kennedy uses for maximum effectiveness when selling goods and services by clicking here now.

The Three Biggest Reasons Businesses Fail…And What To Do Instead.

By: Dave Dee on: September 19th, 2014 3 Comments

We’ve all heard and read about the alarming 80% rate of small businesses that fail in their first 18 months.

It’s been reported by many sources including Bloomberg, the leader in reporting financial and business information

So when I read an article the other day that said 90% of info-marketing businesses fail, it upset me.

I thought to myself, “but why?” This is a formulaic business that anyone can do successfully.

My next thought was… “What can we learn from the businesses that have crashed and burned?”

From years of experience from both running my own businesses and also working with and training hundreds of business owners and info-marketers to build successful, long-term businesses, I have found three main things—that when missing, inevitably shorten the life of the business and cause failure.

I’m not talking about the typically things that you see listed such as running out of money, no business background, no clear unique selling proposition, and so forth. The following are specific to why info-marketing businesses fail, and more importantly what you can do to make sure you don’t experience the same fate.

Reason #1: Inadequate Marketing Research. According to Robert Skrob, President of the Info-marketing Association, the #1 reason he sees info-marketing businesses fail is inadequate research.

Solution: Don’t assume you know everything you need to know about your market. Just because you’ve been living in an industry for a long time doesn’t necessarily mean you don’t need to do additional research.

Thoroughly research your market. Interview potential customers to find out what they want and how they want it delivered. For example, do they prefer to receive your information in a video format or at a live seminar? The answer may surprise you and if you skip the research, you may end up wasting time and money creating the wrong product for your niche.

Reason #2: No continuity income. Continuity income is money you receive on a continual ongoing basis. For example, a membership program where people pay $59 each month for a newsletter. Too often businesses rely on a single sales model—meaning each month they start over selling their programs, books, seminars, etc. The result: until they sell something, they aren’t making any money.

Solution: Create continuity programs so that you start each month with customers already purchasing your products—in other words you have guaranteed income.

Not only do you have consistent income that provides you with cash flow to pay the bills, but as your customer base grows, so will the number of people participating in your continuity programs. This means your income will grow. Plus, because your continuity income is paying the bills, when you hold an event or have a big promotion, you’ll be able to pull out the money you make from it in profit instead of having to use it to pay bills.  GKIC introduces success-minded business owners to their gold membership program by offering a two-month free trial. 

Reason #3: Random Marketing Process. Too many businesses have no marketing systems in place. They run a campaign or promotion, get some customers, fulfill their orders and then have to start over again. Or they only have part of the system in place—such as the sales letter, but no system to continually attract prospects to it. Or no follow-up system.

Solution: If you want to experience a thriving, successful info-marketing business, and truly unlock the freedom and info-marketer lifestyle you dream of, then pay close attention. The secret is to build an automated marketing process.

This process includes marketing systems that continually attract new customers and feed them into a sales funnel that shows customers how you can solve their problems and then invites them to make a purchase.

After they’ve purchased from you, another sales system invites them to make additional purchases from you, including joining your continuity program.

One thing to note, while you can, in essence, create these once and let them run on auto-pilot, you’ll also want a system to track and monitor your results.

It’s also a good idea to use different systems along with testing new ones.

When you do the marketing research, put programs in place to generate continuity income and build an automated marketing process, you’ll have the three key factors that drive a long-lasting, mature and highly successful info-marketing business.

NOTE: Want to avoid making the mistakes that make info-marketing businesses fail and instead enjoy the easiest way possible to generate quick and sustainable wealth from your info-marketing business?

Then be sure to join us for our 2014 Info-SUMMIT.

For more information or to register now click here NOW

 

#1 New York Times Bestselling Book Confirms What Dan Kennedy Has Said All Along

By: Dave Dee on: September 4th, 2014 1 Comment

“Purposeful story telling isn’t show business, it’s good business.”

That’s what Peter Guber says in his #1 New York Times Bestselling book, “Tell To Win”.

And it’s what Dan Kennedy has said for years: Stories sell.

Guber, an extraordinarily successful person who has had a long and varied career serving as studio chief at Columbia Pictures, co-chairman of Casablanca Records and Filmworks, CEO of Polygram Entertainment , Chairman and CEO of both Sony Pictures and Mandalay Entertainment Group substantiates that the benefits of powerful storytelling are not limited to the entertainment business.

Guber, who also oversees one of the largest combinations of professional baseball teams and venues nationwide, is the co-owner of the NBA’s Golden State Warriors, a longtime professor at UCLA, speaker at numerous business forums across the U.S., and has even invested in other businesses set out to PROVE that stories are powerful calls to action for any business.

Looking outside the entertainment industry, Guber turned to some of the most successful business leaders in America to see what their experiences were with using stories in business. And he consulted experts in psychology, narrative medicine, and organizational storytelling to determine if purposeful story telling was a success tool that many in business mistakenly ignore.

His book further supports the importance  of emotionally transporting your customers, clients, and patients via stories in order to get them to take action.

Giving examples from businesses in all different categories and walks of life—Guber cites stories from businesses such as restaurants, financial planners, eye doctors, lawyers, investors, politicians, and many more. He also shows how both story-tellers and non-story-tellers can employ stories to help them succeed.

Here are some key points I picked up from reading his book:

To be considered a story, you need surprise. Pay close attention to this one: when you give your audience exactly what they expect, with no surprise, you will bore your audience. This is NOT a story. Surprise is what makes a story and makes your story memorable.

Telling stories is a tool anyone can use. Stories aren’t reserved for the rich, the educated, the intelligent, the successful, and so on. You don’t have to have a certain education or reach a certain age or income level to tell and listen to stories or use them to win.

People are wired for stories. Think of your own experiences. From the time you are young, you are told stories. As you get older, you read story books. When you are with your friends and family—or even at the office, you tell stories.

It makes perfect sense that we are wired for stories, yet many businesses ignore this potent tool and lean towards stating facts and statistics instead. (Check out some particularly compelling research on stories verses statistics in Chapter 3, along with a super idea that a financier on Wall Street used to get more done.)

Beware of hidden time bombs. We tend to repeat our stories. Depending on the nature of your personal back stories, this repetition can produce positive or negative results. Ignore the power of your own back-story and these can surface at inopportune times.  The good news is that you can use your negative experiences in ways so that they won’t continue to affect you negatively or creep up and sabotage you unexpectedly when you least expect them to (such as when you are trying to close a big deal.)

Find the “it.” You need the thing that will emotionally transport your audience. Without this piece, your audience won’t get what your proposition is, even if it is a complete no-brainer to you, meaning people will say “no” when you fully expect them to say “yes.”

Same story. Different resolution. You may have a great story, but the wrong resolution for your audience. Know your audience well and you’ll know what they will respond to.

Also, you can use the same story with different resolutions for different audiences. For example, let’s say you have an idea for an information marketing business, but you need others to invest in your idea. You could tell the same story about your idea, but for the investor who has money to spare and loves the risk, you’d paint a picture of the big pay-out potential. While the investor who doesn’t have any money to invest, but has knowledge or skill he can invest, you’d paint a picture that involves him gaining reputation that could lead to more and better-paying clients.

One is a dangerous number. Just as Dan Kennedy has said many times, one is a dangerous number. This is no exception. Stories should be told in offline and online marketing as well as in face-to-face situations.

Of course it is impossible for me to summarize here everything you will discover about why and how to use stories in your business.  However, if you consider these tips and focus on telling stories in your business, you can make facts and figures more memorable, make your products and services resonate with your audience, and get more people to take action.

NOTE: Recently I interviewed Peter Guber, who will be our celebrity guest speaker at this year’s Info-Summit. This is a GREAT interview. PACKED with wisdom, you’ll be surprised at how many golden nuggets you pull out of this in the short time it will take you to listen to it.

You can find Peter’s full interview with me by clicking here. During the interview you’ll discover:

  • How to rescue yourself after failure.
  • What Guber learned about credentials that will help you be more successful.
  • What gives Guber the most satisfaction out of all of his accomplishments and why he feels his education began when he left school.
  • How to deal with continual change.
  • Guber’s personal mantra and how this will help you be authentic.
  • How to remain risk-adverse.
  • And lots more besides.

Listen to Peter Guber’s interview here.

P.P.S. Today is the FINAL DAY for you to receive a discount and save up to $1,297. Rates will increase tomorrow. For more information or to register now, visit www.gkic.com/is2014 NOW

One of the biggest money-making super-powers

By: Dan Kennedy on: August 24th, 2014 1 Comment

Dan Kennedy here.

I wanted to let you know that I just did a special call with Dave Dee about something vitally important…

You see ever since I spent the other day with you, the questions I’ve been receiving have made it abundantly clear to me that there is a critical piece of information missing.

It concerns one of the biggest money-making super-powers you’ll ever learn. Because once you “get it,” you’ll make a major shift in your thinking—and your income. Life and business will be different for you. Easier. More rewarding. More effective. More time-efficient. More lucrative. Better.

So I recorded this call so you’ll have the missing piece that will help you close more sales, get more visitors to sign up, download, watch, and buy.

Click here to listen to it now.

NOTE: Dave will be telling you about a special bonus worth $497 that is only available today as part of the Make Them Buy Now System & Toolkit at the end of this call. Which by the way, if you haven’t invested in yet, you should do so immediately here.

HOWEVER, this call is not a sales pitch. It’s about helping you to make a major shift in your thinking that will forever impact your business, your income, and ultimately your life. If in the next month, next year, or ten years from now you want your income to go up, then you need to understand this piece of the puzzle.

Listen here now before another year slips by with no change in your income.

Five Stealth Persuasion Secrets That’ll Get Your Prospects To Buy From You

By: Dave Dee on: August 2nd, 2014 4 Comments

While interviewing Founder and CEO of Mandalay Entertainment Peter Guber the other day, I asked him about his new book and why he wrote it.

His answer revealed an important point as to why anyone who wants to be more successful should create an information product—whether it’s writing a book, creating a webinar or recording something on audio.

He said that writing a book (i.e. creating an information product) is another means of advancing the thought process and putting it in a format in which people can use those ideas.

In other words, for himself, he did it as act of self-discovery and to advance his own personal knowledge and understanding of the subject.

For others, he did it as a means of giving people meaning to the information that he was sharing.

I love the answer he gave, because it makes total sense. Through the process of creating an information product about a subject, you learn more about it which helps you to formulate new ideas and advance your own knowledge.

And for others, it gives them another way to digest your information that will also help them formulate new ideas and have a better, more advanced understanding of the a subject.

This is a key concept to understand.

Because as business owners, we ALL need to educate our consumers better.

In fact, educating your consumer will make him/her more loyal to you. The more loyal a consumer, the longer they will stick with you. The longer they stick with you, the more they will buy. The more they buy, the bigger champion they become. The bigger champion they are, the more likely they are to refer people to you. (And let’s not forget that referred customers tend to be more loyal and spend more.)

So creating information products is about much more than trying to make a buck or two. Done right, creating information products will advance your own knowledge, plus it will help you to create better (and more) customers.

But to do those two things, there’s something you’ll want to do in every info-product you create and that is…

You’ll want to persuade.

For example, if I go to the orthodontist to get braces for my son and the orthodontist asks me what kind of braces I want with no explanation of the difference, I’m likely to go with the least expensive choice that will get the job done.

If he takes a little time to explain the difference, I may choose a more expensive option, however it will depend on a lot of factors including if I feel I have enough information to make a good decision.

But if the orthodontist gives me a book that explains all the different choices I have, what his philosophy is for how he chooses braces for his patients, and what his beliefs are about the different product lines based on his experience, then I have a lot more information to make a better decision.

Am I right?

Now let’s say that the orthodontist believes Invisalign Braces are the best choice in most cases. Despite that being the more expensive choice, I am likely to take it since the orthodontist has now laid out his philosophy and the reasons why this is the best choice.

And because the orthodontist took the time to lay out all the choices, he may have an even more advanced understanding himself as to why he feels that way.

Sure, the orthodontist could explain all of that in person, but let me ask you something—

Where will I be more likely to feel like I’m being “sold” and where will I feel like I’m being “educated”?

Option1: When the orthodontist tells me in an appointment what he feels is the best option?

OR

Option 2: When I am handed a book that explains all the options and I have time to absorb the information?

Option 2. Because I’ll have all the information in front of me and will feel I can make a more educated decision.

Taking all of that into consideration, here are some things to include that will help you achieve those two goals:

1)      Sell them on your concepts. If you pay close attention, you’ll notice that Dan Kennedy’s books, courses, news-letters, articles, etc. all explain and educate people on his concepts. That repetition helps people better understand these concepts and advances their success.

What concepts do you want your customers to understand? Know what these are and make a list of them so you can refer and be guided by them.

2)      Sell (or re-sell) them on your philosophy. This is another thing Dan does well. Everyone has a philosophy of how and why things should be done. What’s yours? Be sure to have a good understanding of this and incorporate it into your products so that your customers can adopt it too.

3)      Re-sell your products. Reminding people what your product will do for them will help your customers get more out of your product because not only will they know what to expect, but subconsciously they will be looking for it.

4)      Sell them on the opportunity your product or service provides. It’s not just the physical value that your product or service brings to your client, customer, or patient. What opportunities will they experience as a result of using your product or service? For example, will they experience more freedom and fewer struggles?

5)      Sell them what’s next. Once you have laid out your philosophy, concepts, their choices, and so forth, you want to be sure and include the steps for what they should do next. You may even want to include a limited time bonus gift to create some urgency to take the next step.

Create info-products that “sell” these five things and you’ll help advance both your understanding and your customer’s…and when you do, you’ll not just make a sale, you’ll convert a prospect into a customer, which is an entirely different thing.

**What’s HOT at GKIC This Week Through August 4, 2014**  If creating an info-product to educate your customers and advance your own knowledge sounds like a good idea, but you’re feeling overwhelmed by the idea, then I have some GREAT news for you.

This weekend ONLY we are offering Dan Kennedy’s Foolproof Recipe For Creating Product That’ll Explode Your Income, Create Customers for Life and Make YOU the “go-to” Person In Your Niche.  It’s called the Info-Product Recipe  PLUS we’re offer a special exclusive training that the creator of Product Launch Formula, Jeff Walker did for us.  In it he gives the EXACT process he used to create his initial Product Launch Formula—which generated $600,000 in its first week. The best part is this is a super simple, EXTREMELY quick way to create a product FAST—plus he’ll show you how to do this even if you don’t have a list.

To learn more about how to get this training, click here.

Bonus For Investing In Info-Profit Recipe

By: Dave Dee on: July 30th, 2014 No Comments

The video below is your bonus worth $497 for investing in Info-Summit. In this video you’ll get the four steps to getting your info business up and running in the next 60 days. Please do not share this page with others.  Thanks and Enjoy!

Elvis May Have Left The Building, But He Still Has Loyal Followers Who Buy

By: Dave Dee on: July 27th, 2014 1 Comment

Sixty years ago this month, in July of 1954, music history was made when the then unknown Elvis Presley recorded the first commercial song of his career.

The song—“That’s All Right (Mama)” set him on a path to superstardom.

In fact, many still consider him to be the undisputed King of Rock and Roll.

Elvis still holds records for “the most Top 40 hits (114), the most Top 10 hits (40) and the most weeks at Number One (80).” (These is for the Pop charts and only in America. He was also a leading artist in American country, R&B, and gospel fields and his chart success in other countries was substantial.)

In fact, in 2004, the Recording Industry Association of America announced that Elvis had become the bestselling solo artist in history.

Twe-e-e-n-t-y-seven years after his death.

Even in death, his stature grows.

Graceland, Elvis’ white columned mansion and estate, has become one of the most visited private homes in America with over 600,000 visitors every year paying anywhere from $15 to $72 to tour the home. And according to Elvis Presley Enterprises is one of the five most visited home tours in the United States, and is the most famous home in America after the White House.

After fans tour Graceland, they are turned loose to shop in the Graceland gift shops.

In 2012, overall Elvis business, including royalties and licensing, totaled $57.3 million.

Search for “Elvis souvenirs” in Google and you’ll get 1,060,000 results. In fact, there are whole businesses created for the sole purpose of selling Elvis items such as “Elvisly Yours” and “Elvis Collectibles.”

Visit Elvis fans’ homes and you’ll find whole shrines built around him—with posters, paintings, collectibles and framed pictures. Some fans even attribute a sacred character to certain objects associated with Elvis. Extreme fans go so far as to collect items from Elvis’ personal life such as toenails and his used water cups.

Fans recount stories of Elvis and re-tell his life story.

Every year there are pilgrimages to Memphis on Elvis’ birthday (January 8th) and the anniversary of his death (August 16th).

The man has a herd of committed followers, that’s for sure.

And while I’d probably apply for a restraining order if someone expressed interest in collecting my toenail clippings for display in their house, can you imagine developing a loyal following like that?

What would that do for your business?

Fans that continue to buy and re-buy your products or re-packaged items and build shrines in their homes of you for the entire world to see—spreading the word about how great you are.

What would that do for your bottom line?

Well we might not be able to get you quite to “Elvis stature,” but we can help you discover how to build a relationship with your customers so that they will want their pictures taken with you and will build mini-shrines at home or in their office.

This is the kind of herd you want to build. Because a herd like that will stay with you forever.

Isn’t that what you want?

So exactly what should you do to build a loyal herd?

Click here to find out now…

Here are four things you can do to build a big, loyal following starting today:

Target the people most likely to benefit from your product or service. When building your list, create offers which your target audience are most likely to receive an IMMEDIATE result. People who have success quickly using your products or services are more likely to trust that they will get results with future purchases from you. This can turn them into hyper-responsive and loyal fans.

Attract your BEST prospects. Who are your ideal clients, customers, or patients? Create a system for attracting these customers and these alone. One mistake I often see is that business owners think they should try and attract as many people as possible. As a result, what happens is you end up with people who are not a good fit for you or are “bad apples” that talk bad about your product or service. This only hurts you. Focus on the people who will love what you have to offer and avoid the rest.

Use both offline AND online list-building methods. It’s tempting to rely on online methods only to build your list, but you’ll build a much bigger and better list if you combine both online and offline. Plus you’ll build your list faster.

Invest in relationship building strategies. If you want your list to stick around for years and years and continue buying from you, you’ll want to spend time and money investing in the types of marketing that will build your relationships with your list such as giving them great, relevant, and free content or following up after a purchase to see if they have any questions about how to use their purchase.

***THIS Weekend Only—Through Monday, July 28, 2014***DISCOVER the BEST strategies on the planet and the latest breakthroughs for building RESPONSIVE lists with this treasure chest of list building Gold—that even Elvis himself could have benefited from—by clicking here.

Three Ways Your List Can Teach You How To Yield A Better Response

By: Dave Dee on: July 22nd, 2014 1 Comment

When he started out, he had no idea he was going into marketing.

An English major, he thought he was going to be an editor or a writer or something.

But when he applied for this little publishing company that published newsletters and books, that type of job wasn’t available. So he took a job with in-house list management instead.

That was 33 years ago.

In less than a decade that “little company” did over $100 million in revenue.  Its revenues now stand at $150 million dollars a year. If you look at his product portfolio today you’ll see that it includes THE LARGEST paid subscription newsletters in its category in America, built from scratch.

You may even recognize some of the publications  that he helped make into giants such as BottomLine Personal Newsletter, BottomLine Health, Boardroom Reports and famous books such as The 30-Day Diabetes Cure.

I’m, of course, talking about one of the most respected business builders and company leaders in the professional direct marketing community—Brian Kurtz.  (I’ve got an exclusive live interview with Brian this Friday the 25th…click here to listen live)

Brian says he got a fantastic education by learning direct marketing from the list side of things. He also shares what he learned early on from direct marketing pioneer and consultant Dick Benson who told him  “no one ever spends enough time on lists.”

The problem with email is that because it is so cheap to send, often businesses send emails without much regard to timing and what order they send promotions and so forth. But because of the costs of direct mail, Brian found that you have to be very disciplined about these sorts of things. And here’s the thing: if you pay more attention to certain items with your list, whether you are sending direct mail or marketing to your list online, you will improve your response rate.

Here are three things you can learn from your lists that will help you improve your response rate.

1)      Where are the markets?  You have the ability to segment your lists and test them. That means that if you start with a small segment, testing things and finding what gets a good response, you’ll be able to find other names that are similar.  For example, let’s say in testing you discover that married couples with children in school and live in the suburbs respond well to your offer. Once you have that information, you can search those names out which fit that criteria in much larger universal lists.

2)      What is in demand in those markets? You can learn a lot by how a name gets on a list and by the feedback for what you are doing.

For example, let’s say you send out a series of emails to one part of your list and a direct mail piece to the rest of your list. Your best response comes from the people who were sent your direct mail piece (a sales letter mailed out in a number 10 envelope with a buy one get one free offer.)

This tells you a lot about how they will respond—meaning your list responded better to direct mail than to email.  You can even test types of packages.  So in this case, even if the demographics are slightly off, if the response is good to certain type of package and offer, then it will be good to other similar formats and offers  too.

3)      What products do people want? One thing is certain about direct response advertising—it’s measurable.  Back in the earlier days of Boardroom, after trying several different models, a successful model was discovered. Previously Boardroom tried selling a series of different business books that were made with various people they had met over the years. These books were about various subjects, but none of them became that big.

Then they put together a book called the Book of Business Knowledge. This was basically Boardroom’s greatest hits. When this did so well, it became the model they would use to sell millions of books. They did the same thing with newsletters. They figured out from their list what people wanted and then created the product to match it.

Spend time learning from your lists.  When you do, you will find that you know more about your target audience, what they want and what they respond to. And in doing so, you’ll be able to market better to them which means you’ll get a much better response.

NOTE:  You can get the full inside story from Brian Kurtz including—insider facts and statistics, methods, product idea process, list sources and more—the kind of information that comes from 33 years’ experience actually selling millions of dollars of books and newsletters to paying customers in multiple categories—at this year’s InfoSUMMIT. Don’t miss seeing Brian live and in person –and if you hurry you can still receive an early bird discount at www.gkic.com/infosummit

In the meantime, Brian Kurtz will be on with me live on Friday.  Click here to listen in…