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Archive for the ‘Persuasion Strategies’ Category


How To Sell More, Faster And More Efficiently

By: Dave Dee on: August 7th, 2014 1 Comment

“One night a year all crime—including murder—is legal for 12 hours.”

That is in the description for the movie trailer for “The Purge: Anarchy” currently in theaters.

Maybe you’ve seen the ad for the movie? It shows total chaos and innocent people trapped on the streets among people committing horrible crimes. Pretty frightening stuff, especially if you put yourself into that scenario.

Talk about triggering emotion!

Movie trailers are a great example of tapping into deep emotions that get reactions from their viewers and make them want to see a movie.

Whether a trailer is so scary you can’t bear to look or it is so heartfelt it makes you cry, the makers of movie trailers are masters of using emotion to sell viewers on watching their movies.

Appealing to your target audience’s emotions is a critical key ingredient that will help you sell more of your products and services, faster, and more efficiently.

Emotions are strong feelings that move people to action. So when you create promotions and ads that arouse the right emotions, you’ll get your prospects to buy what you are selling.

How do you do that? Today I’ll walk you through a simple two-step process that will allow you to not only trigger emotions, but trigger the RIGHT emotions that will get your prospects and customers to move to action.

Step 1: Identify the buying emotion. If you’ve studied copy at all, you likely have witnessed this done. In fact, two emotions commonly used are fear and greed. And don’t get me wrong, these are two emotions that work well. However, it’s important to remember that these aren’t the only two emotions people have, nor are they always the best or most effective triggers. In fact, if these are the only two trigger emotions you use, you will likely lose out on a big portion of sales.

People feel a range of emotions from anger to happiness to sorrow to laziness. When creating your marketing, you first need to identify the correct emotion (or emotions) that will stimulate your prospect or customer to buy.

Remember that the buying emotion is often made up of a mixture of emotions.  When you use a mixture of emotions, you’ll not only reach more of your target audience, but you’ll reach them on a deeper level and invoke more sales.

How do you identify the right buying emotion?

  • Study high-converting promotions.  By looking at promotions you know have been tested and are working, you can identify core emotions that are working well with your target audience. When picking promotions to study, it’s not a requirement that the product and service matches yours. Rather than that, look at who the promotion is targeting and whether that is a match for your target audience. What emotions are they tapping into?  Would these work for your product or service?
  • Find out what your target audience is saying. Hang out where your target audience is, “listen” to what they talk about and the way they talk.

For example, you can visit online chat rooms where your target audience hangs out to find out what they are saying and the way they say it. To do this, just visit a chat room that matches your topic. For instance, if you are selling financial products, you might hang out in the MSN Money chat room.

Step 2: Utilize the buying emotion to build desire.  Once you’ve identified the correct mixture of trigger emotions that make up your buying emotion, you’ll use them to build desire for your product or service. The idea is that by the time your prospect gets through your ad or promotion the emotion is so strong he can actually picture himself experiencing the scenario you’ve painted for him so much so that he is driven to make a purchase.

For example, an ad for a supplement that helps with joint pain might depict someone in their sixties with a before and after scenario.  The first scenario depicts the main character in pain, sitting on the sidelines and unable to participate in activities she enjoys. The person may even look older or unhappy. The after scenario depicts the same person smiling and enjoying life—gardening, riding bikes, and hiking. More than one emotion is tapped into here, and the desire to avoid pain and feeling old along with the desire to be able to enjoy life is so high by the end of the ad, that the prospect can picture him or herself being able to get back out and enjoy life again that he is driven to purchase the product.

If you want to persuade people to buy more, you must understand the emotions that spur them to take action. Discover the triggers that do this, and how to evoke those emotions, and you’ll sell more, faster, and more efficiently.

DON’T MISS THIS: If you want the 7 Secrets To Experience A Dramatic Increase in Sales Immediately, then click here now as Dan Kennedy Reveals the seven MOST powerful triggers you can use to significantly increase your sales starting today!  This goes way beyond anything you’ve ever been taught and taps into the underlying secrets the best sales people are using today to get their prospects to buy now!

Simply click here now.

 

 

A Horribly Neglected Ad Strategy That Still Gets The BEST Results

By: Dave Dee on: July 29th, 2014 2 Comments

Recently, my good friend Frank Kern told me he ran the single most successful test he has done in 15 years.  Here’s how the test came about…

Frank analyzed an ad that was responsible for growing a tiny company into a BIG company by generating some three million leads (from that ONE ad)…

It was also the inspiration for ads created by David Ogilvy, one of the most sought after advertising executives of all time.

In fact, Ogilvy took this ad, analyzed it, perfected it, and systematized it. He then used this system to create 17 ads which were responsible for growing Ogilvy into a 1.4 Billion (with a “B”) business back in the 1970’s.

Despite how wildly successful this ad system was, it, and the system Ogilvy developed from it, were largely forgotten about as people moved on to the “next new and shiny object” placed in front of them.

That is until Frank ran across it again and decided to do a test.

Here are a few things that Frank says about why this worked so well and why this strategy will work better than just about anything else you can try these days:

It didn’t try to sell anything. The ad wasn’t full of hype or sales tactics. In fact, it didn’t try to sell anything at all and instead gave away something free to the reader. Plus it didn’t use any fancy copywriting techniques. It is a simple, basic and non-sophisticated formula that you could use in all types of media.

It focused on the right kind of value.  Typically an ad will deliver “practical value” which means the ad addresses the things your product or service does. For example, a restaurant will cook you a meal. A coffee maker will brew you a cup of coffee.

But what fuels a buying frenzy is when you deliver intrinsic value. This is the unseen value which can really drive frenzy and get people clamoring to pay you more for your products and services.

For example, suppose you want to have steak for dinner. You can choose between Longhorn Steakhouse or Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse. They both will cook you steak. They even have similar items on the menu such as a baked potato, salad, and a center cut steak.  But Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse charges much higher prices, and people are willing to pay it. Why? Because Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse has that “unseen value” associated with having a higher intrinsic value.

It addressed reader skepticism.  Now more than ever, people are skeptical. They don’t trust marketing and advertising. Rather than ignoring this fact, the ad addresses this skepticism right up front by telling people why they are doing the ad.  This confronts the obstacle head on and eliminates their skepticism before continuing on with the message.

It explained why not all the information was included in the ad. It gave a logical explanation for why all the information the reader would need was not included in the ad—therefore giving the reader a good, solid reason for why they should contact the company for more information.

The headline uses presupposition. The headline uses the brilliant technique of presupposition. It presupposes that you want to know something about the topic and it also presupposes that there is something you don’t know. This is a great technique that will increase your readership and raise curiosity.

Use these strategies to generate more leads, customers, and create a frenzy that causes people to want to pay you more for your products and services.

Yesterday Frank released a brand new video where he took this concept from a theoretical level down to “how you do this in your business.”  This was in all honesty one of the best trainings I’ve seen in a long time (I took two full pages of notes) and right now he’s giving it away.

Click here now to get the video.  Yes, to get the video you have to give an e-mail address, but if you don’t like it, and don’t want more, just unsubscribe immediately.  You’d be crazy to do that, in my humble opinion, but it’s an option.  In this short video he explains the concept of an “internal decision trigger” where in essence you get the prospect to sell themselves your product or service.  In a word it’s amazing.

NOTE: If you’d like the template and swipe file Frank created from the Ogilvy ads, he’s giving them away free right now along with the swipe file of the Ogilvy ads, and the case study of the test he ran using the template. You can get them all at no charge by clicking here NOW.

A Big Persuasion Secret You Can Learn From Hanging Out With Kids

By: Dave Dee on: July 24th, 2014 4 Comments

One of my favorite traditions is spending one on one time individually with each of my kids.

Whether it’s taking my son to a major league baseball game or taking my daughter to the theater to watch a Broadway show, I love spending time alone with each of them and being truly present when we are together.

Years ago, it wasn’t that way. I still spent one on one time with each of my kids, but not really “be with them” because I was worried about money or where my next client was coming from. I spent more time focused on worrying than on what was really important.

Now that I have systems in place that work like clockwork to attract my ideal clients, my life and income are different.

More importantly, my relationship with my children is better and even more rewarding since I now focus on them entirely during this special time with them.

There is actually a great sales and persuasion secret hidden in my story.

The key here is in the outcome—that our relationship is more rewarding.

Not only do good things happen when I’m with my children, but I find that because of this sales and persusasion secret, good stuff happens everywhere I go. For example, I’ll go to a restaurant and get a free dessert. Or I’ll go the theater and my seats will be upgraded.

How does this happen? Well, whether I’m hanging with my kids or out getting a steak at my favorite restaurant, I am very friendly, I am present, I ask questions AND I bring people into my reality. This is cool stuff so let me explain each piece of the puzzle so that you can use these techniques to make your customer relationships more rewarding.

1)      Be fully present: As I mentioned earlier, I used to not be fully present when I was spending this special one on one time with each of my kids. I was too distracted by worry.

Now, I really listen to people and am truly interested in what they have to say (whether it’s my son or a client.) When I speak to clients, I block everything else out and focus on just them.

Most people are never present. They are too busy thinking about what they are going to say or worse, their mind is completely somewhere else. People can feel when you are really listening to them and when you are pretending to listen to them.

2)      Be friendly: Not that I would be unfriendly with my kids, but when I was worried about money and my business, I could be a bit cranky at times. Smile and look people in the eyes. I mean REALLY look into the eyes of your prospects and customers. Also, project positive and fun energy. You know the guy or gal that is always positive and the life of the party—the one that everyone wants to be around? Be THAT person.

3)      Ask questions. When I’m with my kids, I ask questions that help me get to know a ton about their dreams, goals and desires.

The cornerstone of sales is asking questions. Instead of using traditional, old-fashioned sales training questions which are self-serving and highly manipulative, ask questions that are designed to learn about what your prospect wants, needs and desires on a deep level.

4)      Bring people into your reality.  After I ask questions to my kids and they open up about what is going on in their lives, I open myself up to them. For example, I might tell a story about a challenging situation I was in when working with a client or tell them an embarrassing story about something that happened to me when I was their age.  By opening myself up and sharing personal things, they not only are brought into my reality, but they feel more comfortable with opening up to me.

When talking to a prospect or customer, you can do the same thing. For instance, a dentist might tell a story about when he had to have one of his own teeth repaired or personal trainer might tell a story about being overweight and how lifting weights changed his life. When you can bring people into your own reality and share your own vulnerability, people will connect with you more.

It’s important to note that when I’m with my kids or in any situation where I’m at a restaurant, theater, etc. I’m NOT looking to get anything. I’m not trying to manipulate my kids or get people to give me free stuff.

Good stuff just happens as result of what I do. As I’ve said before, the difference between manipulation and persuasion is intent.

My intent in all of these cases was simply to have fun, make people laugh and feel good. In a selling situation your intent should be NOT to just sell your product or service at all costs, but rather to find a solution to your prospects problems and to fulfill their wants needs and desires. This will result is MORE SALES than if you focus on just selling your product.

HUGE: You want to be externally focused NOT internally focused when selling.

Re-read the four points above and you will see they are all externally focused, focused on my kids or the people I was communicating with.

I would love to hear your thoughts on this post. Comment below.

NOTE: Tomorrow, Friday July 25th, I’m going to be speaking with Boardroom Publishing’s Brian Kurtz.  Click here to join in live for FREE.

If you don’t know who Brian is but you like the simple idea of sending out a piece of mail and making money in return then you NEED to be on this call.  Brian Kurtz has generated over $150,000,000 in sales by using direct response marketing.  Tomorrow he’ll reveal some of his strategies including giving you a glimpse into…

☞ DETAILS of a “Product Launch” selling over 200,000 units.

☞ His “Ah-Ha! Moment” about doing research to pick ‘The Next Big Thing’ to promote to his subscribers and customers.

☞ Lessons Learned in the Mailing List Business in the 1980’s that are WORTH MILLIONS TODAY in extracting huge profits and great customers from available databases.

☞ What it’s like to work with The Best Copywriters and how to get them to compete with each other for your benefit.

☞ How ANY author can stay out of the bookstore and make a fortune “direct to consumer.”

☞ AND much, much more…

Anyway, this is a one-time only live call and you’ll have the chance to ask him your questions.  Click here now to get the details and mark your calendar for tomorrow!

Are You Using This Free Potent Persuasion Technique

By: Dave Dee on: July 1st, 2014 3 Comments

Ahhh. Summer. Traveling. Baseball. Outdoor concerts and events…

As I was exploring my options for this Friday’s Fourth of July festivities, I became even more keenly aware of what a potent persuasion technique the use of social proof is.

As you know, many people turn to the web, and/or their smartphones to explore their choices when traveling, dining out, making plans to go out or just about anything they plan to spend time and money on.

This is good news for small business owners.

It allows you more opportunities to sell your products, services and events—even extend your reach further around the world should you choose to.

However, this also gives a stronger voice to the consumer. It used to be that whether you were happy with your service, or wanted to make a complaint, you had to write a letter or make a phone call.  The consumer might also tell a friend, family or neighbor about their experience too. But usually not more than a couple of handfuls of people would hear about it.

Now-a-days your customers can share their story about an experience by leaving a review of your product or service immediately online –where the whole world can see what they have to say. In fact, next to nearly everything you search for online, you’ll find “customer reviews” telling you what other people think of whatever product, service or event you are searching for.

Want to find a resort to stay in for your vacation get-a-way? You’ll see what customers had to say about the resort. And I don’t think I’m going out on a limb by saying that you’ll consider what they have to say before you reserve your room.

Want to choose a restaurant near where you are, you might check out what people have to say on Yelp.

Everything from restaurants to dental care to products we buy have customer reviews.

This increased consumer power can be good or bad. When they aren’t happy with the service and/or product they can let the world know. On the flip side, if they are happy, they can also let everyone know by leaving a review, tweeting about it, posting photos on Facebook, blogging about it and more.

Making this even more important is the fact that  consumers trust their fellow consumers more than they trust professional critics.

According to market research by Weber Shandwick, 88% of consumers say they still consult consumer reviews even when they are “somewhat” or “very knowledgeable” about their purchase. Furthermore, consumers report that they pay more attention to consumer reviews (77%) than they do to professional critic reviews (only 23%.)

Which means the use of social proof is an even more potent persuasion technique in your marketing and sales process than ever before.

And if you can’t prove something, then don’t say it.

You need an overwhelming quantity and quality of proof to prove that what you’re saying is true too.

So what is “quality proof?” Basically you want testimonials with full names, details, pictures, and precise numbers to back your case.

Six rules for “quality” social proof that will be the most potent persuasive tools:

1)      Include specifics. In Weber Shandwick’s research, it was found that the most influential reviews include certain elements.  For example, they needed to seem fair and reasonable, be well-written, and contain statistics, specifics and technical data when applicable.

2)      You need a lot of proof. If you only have a few testimonials, don’t put them on a page that looks like there is space left over. Put them on a small piece of paper (or website) so it looks like you really had to cram them in.

3)      Let your consumers answer objections.  You want to have testimonials that answer objections and questions that your prospect typically has.  Many times your best customers, clients and patients will come to your defense and as Dan Kennedy says “What others say about you in 1000x more powerful than anything you say about yourself”

4)      Round up a sampling of informative reviews on your website. Simplify the process for consumers and reduce the likelihood of them being lured to your competitor’s website by including a sampling of consumer reviews on your website. By including the information consumers seek when making buying decisions, you’ll make it easier for them—and quite frankly more persuasive for you.

5)      Keep your reviews and testimonials authentic. Publically announce a policy that prevents employees from commenting or leaving reviews about your product or service.

6)      Encourage customers to review your products and services. Dedicate resources to getting customers to review your products and services and ask for testimonials.  While you can’t directly influence user reviews, you can encourage people to give reviews. Then pick those with the most potential to have the biggest impact and post them to our website, social networks, and so on.  If you sell products online you probably have the e-mail address of buyers…after a few weeks send them an e-mail asking for them to review your product with a link.  If you sell through a retail location, simply give them a card on their way out that has review instructions and on the other side give them some kind of offer for returning or referring others to your business.

Also, ask for written testimonials. When asking for testimonials from your customers and clients, ask questions that will help guide them to give you specific answers. You might also ask questions such as “What were your doubts about trying our product?” and “What specifically do you like best about our service?”

Bottom line: The more proof you have, the easier selling will be and the more money you will make.

Happening Now: Direct Response Marketer and Product Launch Guru Jeff Walker just released his first-ever book on Amazon, and it’s already a legit bestseller. And now he’s stacking the bonuses on to keep it at the top of the charts.

If you don’t know Jeff, he literally created the online product launch… and he’s been training thousands of people to do those launches for ten years. In fact, his clients have done over $500 million in launches.

If there’s one thing he knows how to do, it’s put together a crazy launch offer – and that’s exactly what he’s done. If you get his book on Amazon.com, he’ll flat-out GIVE you $291.00 in bonuses.  To check it out simply click here.

 

Dangerous stuff man, dangerous stuff…

By: Dave Dee on: May 21st, 2014 10 Comments

Gather ‘round the campfire and let Uncle Dave tell you a spooky, true story.

It all started back when I was doing a birthday party magic show at a very wealthy man’s home.

I had just started to dip my toe in the lucrative corporate entertainment market and definitely wanted to do more of those gigs and less kid shows.

As I’m doing my show, I casually mentioned that my next trick I recently debuted at show I did for IBM.

I’m not sure why I mentioned it. It must have been my subconscious mind telling me something.

After the show was over, the man, who happened to be the VP of Sales for a major corporation  came over to me and asked, “So you shows for corporations? I’d love to have you perform at my next sales meeting.”

That’s when I discovered the power of “casual mentions” or what is also known as “seeding” an audience.

This is one of the most powerful ways to plant thoughts into your prospects’ (audiences’) minds.

Here’s the beauty of seeding:

If planted properly, the seeds will start to sprout and then you can make them rapidly grow and take hold of your prospects’ mind on demand.

Soon the thought  you originally planted, will bloom and the prospect will believe the thought they now have is their own.

Read that last sentence again and let it sink in.

The prospect will believe that the thought that they now have is their own.

This is what Psychic Sales is all about…making the prospect come to the conclusion that they MUST buy what you’re offering and that they discovered the solution to their problem.

Let me give you real example that I use in almost every one to many sales presentations I do.

In fact, if you tune into the live webcast I’m doing this Thursday, you’ll more than likely hear me say something very similar to this.

My goal with this is to overcome the “I can’t afford it” objection.

Here is what I say:

“I remember thinking I can’t afford to buy Magnetic Marketing. Even though it was only $279, I was deep in credit card debt, making almost no money so $279 seemed like a huge amount of money.

But then I remembered something I read where the author said, “Successful people invest in themselves and their education. And they do it before they can afford it and that’s how they become successful.

Well, I knew that if I wanted to be successful, I needed to do what successful people do, so I invested in myself and bought Magnetic Marketing.”

While those words make look simple on paper, they are powerful.

They represent a “master class” in seeding.

First, in this particular case, I am seeding the sale of Magnetic Marketing and anchoring the $279 price point. I’ll tell you why in a minute.

Second, I am planting a seed in the prospects’ mind that “successful people invest in themselves and their education.”

Third, I plant in their mind, “In order to be successful, I need to do what successful people do.”

Now here is a mucho important point:

I am indirectly telling my prospect these things by telling a true story about myself.

I am NOT telling them what I want them to believe, directly.

If I did that, their “He’s trying to sell me” defense would come up and they would resist what I’m saying.

Instead, I am planting a seed in their subconscious mind. My statements fly past their conscious radar and resistance.

Now later on, when I get into the close, what thought springs to the prospects mind?

Right: “Even though I don’t think I can afford this I must buy it because I want to be successful and that’s what a successful person would do.”

But then I make the offer almost irresistible to the prospect by firing off the anchor I set about price by saying:

“Right now Magnetic Marketing sells for $497 on our website and in our catalog but if you invest in yourself right now, you can get it for the same price I got it for over 15 years ago. O-N-L-Y $2-7-9.”

Let the stampede to back of the room begin.

Did you catch everything I did?

I set up the price at $497, used an embedded command ( a Psychic Sales technique) of “invest in yourself right now’  which also recalls the seed I place earlier of successful people investing in themselves.

Then I drop the pricing bomb which ties my story together in a beautiful way.

It makes buying nearly irresistible and not buying almost impossible.

Yeah, this could be dangerous stuff in the wrong hands but if you sell a quality product or service that truly helps your prospect get what they want, then seeding is one of the most powerful tools in your Psychic Sales arsenal.

Use it only for good.

Kick butt, make mucho “DEEnero!”

NOTE: If this stuff interests you and you want to learn how to master  the art of selling one to many, I’m doing a no cost live training this Thursday.

You can get the details and register here now.

The Magic Secret Used By TOP Advertising Strategists To Lift Response Far Above Ordinary

By: Dave Dee on: May 10th, 2014 1 Comment

During my days as a magician I learned a key secret that I still use in business today.

It was essential in, not only putting on an entertaining show, but in getting clients to book me, pay me well and refer me to others.

In fact, it helped me book far more shows than other magicians which had been practicing magic much, much longer than I had.

It’s a secret that the TOP and I mean the very top advertising strategists and copywriters use to lift their response far above the ordinary.

And yet, it’s a secret that most business people ignore.

What is this secret?

Making people believe.

Dan Kennedy says, “The secret behind every extraordinarily successful promoter, marketer, entrepreneur and the fortunes built by them, as well as most other institutions of size and scope, and behind the successful popularizing of anything is making people believe.”

Take Disney. They have an entire “Imagineering” department that is devoted to developing things to make people believe that Disney is the most ‘magical’ and ‘happiest’ place on earth.  One of the goals of this department is to deliver experiences that their audience will not find anywhere else.

A more obvious example comes from recording artist Justin Bieber with his constant message of “Believe.” Based on his unlikely rise to fame by way of YouTube, he’s built a fan base around the idea that anything can happen.

So how do you make people believe? Here are a few ways you can increase your own believability:

1)      Make yourself famous. Harry Houdini is arguably one of the most famous magicians. He was great at self-promotion. One of the ways he would generate publicity for his performances was to strip completely naked and get voluntarily thrown in jail. He’d then escape from the jail cell.  Two other examples of people who make people believe in what they say in part because they’re famous are Dr. Oz and financial advisor Suze Orman.

2)      Be confident. People are much more likely to believe someone who is confident than someone who is unsure of themselves. Rehearsing what you will say and how you will respond to questions from clients will make you appear more confident. (Darcy shared another way to boost your confidence level in The Two Reasons Why People Struggle Or Stall—And How To Get Unstuck[C1] .)

3)      Be fascinating. Last year at SuperConference, Sally Hogshead discussed how you could use your “fascination” to increase fees for your products and services. She pointed out that when all things are equal, whichever thing, person, product, business, service, etc. is the most fascinating will always win. (For more on how to use fascination to your advantage, read my article, “Yes, you’re fascinating, but are you using it to your advantage?”

To be successful at selling your product or service, people must believe in it and you. Determine what you can do today to start making your customers, clients or patients believe in both you and what you have to offer.

NOTE:  If you want to discover the principles for making people believe and getting this secret to work in your business so you can fuel your business and lift your response WAY up, then check out this special message from Dan Kennedy.  In it he’s also offering a bonus that’s unavailable anywhere else.  Click here to find out more.

Can Barbra Streisand And Seth Rogen Turn You Into An Electrifying Salesperson?

By: Dave Dee on: May 16th, 2013 2 Comments

Have you seen the movie “The Guilt Trip”?

It’s the one starring Barbra Streisand and Seth Rogen where Rogen plays the inventor son who takes his nagging mother on a cross country trip while he tries to sell his invention.

Rogen’s character, Andy, has invented this cleaner which is so safe you can get it on your skin, in your eyes, even drink it and it won’t hurt you.

It took him five years to come up with the formula. He spent his entire life savings manufacturing tons of product (before he sold it.) And then set up appointments with major retailers like Costco and K-Mart to see if they would be willing to carry his product in their stores.

Besides the obvious big lesson here of testing to see if anyone is interested in your product or service before you invest tons of time and money in developing it, there is a great sales lesson in this movie.

You see, watching Andy’s pitch is painful—and while it is exaggeratingly bad, it gives some great clues about what not to do and what to watch for during your own sales presentations.

The reaction of the people Andy pitched his product to reveal clues as to what you should look for to determine if you’re on the wrong track when pitching your own products and services to your clients, customers and patients.  Things such as…

  • Shuffling in their seat
  • Checking their phone for emails
  • Staring at someplace other than you

What made Andy so bad? Well he spent all of his time on the scientific facts of the product—which was pretty boring. In other words, he focused on what HE thought was interesting instead of what his audience would find interesting.

Plus he didn’t emotionally hook his audience.

Once again Andy was focused on what he thought was important instead of what was important to his audience.

For example, Andy thought it was interesting that he was able to find the exact natural ingredients to create a cleaner that was not only safe, but didn’t contain any chemicals. While this is why his product worked, this wasn’t the first thing Andy needed to focus on.

Plus, he failed to find out or ask his prospective clients if they had pets or children that might get a hold of a cleaning solution in their own homes. Can you see how making his prospect think about his or her own pet or child may be in grave danger would hit a hot button?

In the end, with a suggestion from his mother, Andy is able to capture the audience’s attention and truly captivate the Home Shopping Network.

What made the difference?

Andy discovers that the person doing the screening test with him has a pet and a young child. So he shows her a familiar cleaner and asks if she uses something like that in her home, to which she replies “yes.”

Then Andy takes the cleaner he invented, takes the cap off and takes a swig of it right there on camera, asking if she could see the cleaning company whose product she uses doing that with their cleaner.

Would that get your attention?

I know it’d get mine!

The problem is that we don’t always do live pitches right? In fact, for some businesses, you may do all of your business online and may never even engage in live interaction at all.

So how do you look for the signs that you are boring your customers?

Well, tracking the time visitors spend on your web site and watching your videos can give you some indicators for starters.

But there is actually a much better way—something that you can use to make sure you never bore your audience and ensure they connect with you every time.

In fact, it’s the explanation behind why certain entrepreneurs get clients to buy and believe while others are often forgotten and ignored.  And best of all, it’s simple to do, once you understand it.

What’s cool about this is that rather than trying to convince someone your product or service is cool or interesting or superior, it automatically gets your audience to drop their barriers, stop being skeptical, believe what you say and trust your opinion.

In essence, it does what Andy did when he drank his cleaning solution: It taps on a hot button so powerful in your audience’s brain—in a predictable way—that people instantly focus on your message.

And that’s what you want people to do, right?

The reason this is important is because it no longer is enough to have the best product or service.  While fictional, Andy’s invention is a classic example. Who wouldn’t want a solution like Andy’s? One that wouldn’t kill you or make you blind if you happened to ingest it or get it in your eye.

Yet, no one and I mean no one, cared about Andy’s product…until…

Andy identified the way to capture 100 percent of his audience’s attention.

And that is step one.  You need to identify what will capture 100 percent of your audience’s attention. Because in today’s instant gratification society your battling shortened attention spans and an increasingly crowded message marketplace.

As he leaves the presentation, Andy and his mother discuss other ways they can capture 100 percent of his audiences’ attention in the future.

And that my friend is step two. You see, once Andy understood how he could get people to focus on him, he could replicate that and make his sales predictable in the future.  In order to succeed, you need a predictable, replicable way to immediately make a powerful connection with your audience, no matter what new products or services you introduce.

Recently I took a test that helped me to understand how I personally captivate people.  In essence, it helped me to better understand what I bring to the table naturally that helps me earn people’s attention so they want to stay focused on what I’m saying instead of heading to the next shiny object.

I discovered the exact things that make me be able to generate $300,000 in sales in a 90 minute presentation…so I can do these things each and every time—making sales predictable. (Take the test here to find out how you capture 100 percent of people’s attention here.)

In a distracted world, if nobody hears you, notices you, and remembers you, then they won’t be taking action on your message. If people aren’t buying your products or services the way you believe they should be, then take the time to find out what people find interesting about you so you can communicate this more consistently and predictably in order to get them to focus 100 percent of their attention on you.

NOTE:  Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

Yes, you’re fascinating, but are you using it to your advantage?

By: Dave Dee on: May 7th, 2013 9 Comments

Last week, I was in Orlando emceeing and presenting at GKIC’s SuperConference. The room was full of the most ambitious, most successful entrepreneurs—the ones that make things happen—who had spent their money and, more importantly, their time to continue learning.   Remember that school is never out for the real pro…no matter what level you are at.

I got the privilege, among those who attended, to be the very first to see Sally Hogshead’s special presentation on how to attract more customers and money using your “fascination.”

Sally showed how she used “her fascination” to go from making $3000 to $30,000 per speaking engagement…and how we could use our “fascination” to increase our fees for our products and services substantially too.

She said, “Your personality is your most valuable asset” and taught us how to use what makes us fascinating to help us stand out in our market place.

Sally pointed out that when all things are equal, whichever thing, person, product, business, service, etc. is the most fascinating will always win.

To demonstrate, she told a story about going on a ride at a theme park. There were two options: a green ticket or an orange ticket. The difference, she was told was “the orange ticket was the more intense and exciting ride and had more thrills. The green ticket was for those who wanted a milder, less intense version of the ride.”

The lines were not only much longer for the orange ticket ride, but the people were visibly and audibly excited in the orange-ticket holder line. On the contrary, in the green-ticket holder line people were subdued and looked kind of bored.

After riding the orange ticket ride, Sally decided to see what the difference was, so she rode the green ticket ride. She discovered that the rides were exactly the same!

So even though the rides were the same, the orange ticket ride held more fascination.

Which type of ride are you supplying your prospects and customers? An uneventful one or an exciting one? If you think you could inject more life into your marketing and business please read on. I’m about to give you 10+ years of research into a few short paragraphs.

You see Sally showed how you can make yourself and your business into the “orange ticket experience” by using what she calls your “fascination advantage.”

The key according to the more than ten years of research that Sally did, are the seven different modes of “communication triggers” which define your “fascination advantage.”  These triggers are: Passion, Trust, Mystique, Prestige, Power, Alarm, and Rebellion.

One of those triggers is your most natural trigger.  You also have a secondary trigger. In all, there are 49 different combinations. And one of these is your “fascination advantage.”

For example, someone who has a primary trigger of power and a secondary trigger of prestige has the personality archetype called “The Maestro.”  Maestros lead with command and earn respect with higher standards.  Their strengths are that they are ambitious, admired, focused, respected, competitive and results-oriented.

The more you build your company around the strengths of your natural trigger, the more successful you will be. Because you are truly unique and no one can imitate you. Which means the greatest value you can add is to become more of yourself.

In fact, Sally’s studies show that when you find ways to accelerate and amplify your fascination, your ideal client’s brain enters into intense focus, almost as if they are spell-bound. This changes their brain and will get them to automatically think “yes” instead of “no,” causing them to go to greater lengths to work with you.

For instance, if you are a “Maestro”, you would focus on targeting people who are decision-makers that want better results. By focusing on your “fascination advantage”, in other words doing more of what comes naturally to you; decision-makers who want better results will be drawn to you.

Sally’s five step system for doing this is to:

1)     Identify your own fascination advantage. (To discover your fascination advantage for FREE, stay tuned)

2)     Fascinate your audience in nine seconds or less. The average attention span in now nine seconds, which means in order to win over your prospect, customer, client or patient, you have to zero in on your fascination advantage in nine seconds or less. For example, if your advantage is prestige, then your prospect wants respect and results. You would fascinate your audience by over-delivering.

3)     Communicate your highest value with the “Golden Triangle.” The three sides of the Golden Triangle represent: the need or problem your client needs solved, the opportunity your product or service has that allows you to solve the need, and your fascination advantage which is how you are most likely to add distinct value.

4)     Optimize your team. Sally says that to optimize your team, you don’t want to hire people that are like you. Instead you want to hire people that will add what you need and compliment your fascination advantage with their own fascination advantage.

5)     Fascinate long-term to create lifelong clients. Think about some of the companies or people that continue to be fascinating such as Apple and Warren Buffet. By focusing on their “fascination advantage”, they continue to lead their field.  Using your fascination advantage long term causes loyalty and an audience willing to pay more for products and services.

Your personality is your ultimate asset. In fact, in many cases your personality doesn’t just add value, it IS the value. The higher income you want and expect, the more it’s about who you are and not what you do.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

Persuasion Secrets: How to Be Fascinating and Influence Other People

By: Dan Kennedy on: February 5th, 2013 3 Comments

In December, Barbara Walters announced her 19th annual list of the year’s “10 Most Fascinating People.”

Making the top ten were actor/director Ben Affleck; Alana Thompson, 7 year old star of the hit reality TV show Honey Boo Boo; the governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie; Olympic Gold Medalist Gabby Douglas; E L James, author of 50 Shades of Grey; Boy Band One Direction; former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; multi-talented animator and director Seth MacFarlane; Prince Harry of Wales; and US Army General David Petraeus.

I’ve long been interested in what makes one person or company more fascinating than another. For instance, what made Honey Boo Boo more fascinating than say Mitt Romney?

Regardless of what you or I think of Ms. Walters’ list, the important point is to reflect on what makes a person or company interesting? If you want to persuade people to buy or seduce them in any way, for any purpose, being fascinating is key.

If you doubt this, look no further than the phenomenon of the online video “Gangnam Style.” Released in July 2012 by South Korean recording artist PSY, it became the first video to ever hit a billion hits on the Internet.

Why did this captivate people while other videos, people, businesses, events etc. won’t be remembered weeks, days or even hours after you first experience them?

Making yourself more fascinating and interesting is a shortcut to persuasion.  It helps make you exciting and memorable which helps you wield influence and attract favorable attention.

This begs the question: are there common traits in fascinating people? Is it possible to make yourself more fascinating and if so, how do you do it? Is there a process?

Take a minute to reflect on the people you’ve met in your life. What makes someone stand out to you? What makes you remember one person over another?

Many would say deciding what traits make a person fascinating is a subjective thing. You might even cite Ms. Walter’s list as confirmation.

After all, if you look at Ms. Walter’s list, it’s difficult to see common traits that everyone shares.  Although I’m sure we could come up with a few.

For instance, Gabby Douglas, Hillary Rodham Clinton and E L James were the “first to do something.” Douglas was the first African-American gymnast to win the Olympic all-around title. Clinton visited more countries than any previous Secretary of State. And E L James sold more than 60 million copies of her book, 50 Shades of Grey, surpassing Harry Potter as the fastest-selling paperback book of all time.

However, not everyone on her list did something for the first time and I’ve met some pretty fascinating people who’ve never been first at anything their whole life.

There’s “celebrity,” which I would say they all have a certain amount of.

You can’t list trustworthy as a common trait on the list if you consider General Petraeus’ resignation as the Director of the CIA, due to his extramarital affair discovered in an FBI investigation.

But, there are fascinating people who are fascinating BECAUSE of their trustworthiness. International author, David Horsager, M.A., C.S.P. did his graduate research based on trust. Searching for what makes top leaders and organizations, defined as financially successful and making a significant positive influence in the lives of those they served over a period of time, unique, Horsager found one thing in common. The common trait? Trust. He found that trust is not a soft skill, but rather that it is a measurable competency that can be built into an organization’s strategies and goals.

And as revealed in my book, No B.S. Trust-Based Marketing, Warren Buffet’s secret on how to attract him to your company and make it so that he might want to buy it, is based on trust. He buys trusted companies that have invested in trust.

All these contradictions make it hard to define what makes a person fascinating. Which is why I have become so intrigued with the work of Sally Hogshead, the New York Times Bestselling author of “Fascinate!” (In fact, I am even collaborating with her on a new exclusive process for dramatically improving marketing messages that I’ll reveal for the first time ever at SuperConference.)

Sally tested a population of 120,000 people and identified seven triggers and 49 personality archetypes that make people fascinating. She has identified that each person has their own, unique “Fascination Fingerprint” which can be used to strengthen virtually everything you do to communicate, influence or sell, whether it’s person-to-person or via media.

Each person has a different primary trigger, which explains why it’s difficult to pull traits off a list of fascinating people.

The seven triggers are: power, passion, mystique, prestige, alarm, rebellion and trust.

For example, people with a primary trigger of power fascinate by leading with control while people with the primary trigger of trust fascinate by building loyalty.

Understanding these triggers and your own “Fascination Fingerprint,” along with your strengths and weaknesses, will allow you to improve your ability to attract favorable attention and become more fascinating, therefore giving you the shortcut to influence.

NOTE: Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.