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Archive for the ‘Work Ethic’ Category

Rich People Have This…Poor People Don’t

By: Dan Kennedy on: February 23rd, 2011 14 Comments

I have come to the reluctant conclusion we should reinstate the draft. Or stick everybody at age 18 out in a dense woods with no supplies, clothes, compass and let only the determined find their way back to civilization.

Or at bare minimum, put each person into a town distant from their own, with $5.00, and only let those able to get a job or make money selling immediately live – lethal injections for the rest. We really need to thin the herd.

What we need are RESOURCEFUL people. And I am dismayed at how un-resourceful even many of “my” people seem to be.

Recently, an otherwise smart client waited 3 weeks and kept bugging us for contact information for someone easily looked up in the association directory I had told him to get, or on Google.

We still get faxes from people wanting to know where to get a particular book I’ve mentioned. Duh. Bookstore, Amazon, library.

I’m weary of telling people to get and use SRDS who won’t. Recently, a vendor royally screwed up a publishing job, discovered their mess on Friday and instead of fixing it and getting on with the job as scheduled over the weekend, just sat on their hands waiting until they could talk to me about it. Pathetic and inexcusable.

A person being paid to place ads turned out to be a pen pal, ping-ponging back problems instead of solving them. The problem she batted back my way could have been taken care of by her, directly, probably with one phone call – and I would never have needed to even know about it, let alone handle it.

I need things done. Not things back in my lap. And I am constantly purging people who don’t get it.

Damned few ‘Message To Garcia’ types out there.

If you want to know a key difference between people making boatloads of money and most who aren’t, it is that those who are, figure things out for themselves, get what they need by hook or crook, are independent and self-reliant and resourceful and wait for no one.

Those who aren’t are stopped on each journey by even the tiniest of pebbles.

Anybody can win with ample resources. Barry Switzer coached the Cowboys to a Super Bowl. As could have you, me or a housecat that year. The resourceful person figures out how to win without resources. How to marshall resources. Without waiting around. Get ‘r done.

Can you start a fire with sticks – or do you need to download instructions from your Bluetooth, have specially treated kindling wood, matches and lighter fluid in a kit.

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Shortcut to a Million Dollar Business

By: Robert Skrob on: June 11th, 2010 7 Comments

The Shortcut to Generating Millions from Your Business

The constant struggle to produce marketing campaigns and run your business makes it difficult to get everything done. Planning is the only true shortcut to running a business which will generate millions of dollars for you.

Once you have completed your planning, you’ll be better able to stay on task, monitor your results, and implement new ideas  during the upcoming year. Without a planning calendar, it’s easy to get distracted by a great new idea and forget about the ideas you had already planned to implement.
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Self-Promotion Equals New Customers

By: Robert Skrob on: May 21st, 2010 10 Comments

The one factor which separates millionaire business owners from the rest is their willingness to promote themselves. Too many entrepreneurs hide behind a corporate façade, trying to make it look as if they have big corporations. However, people want to buy from people, and the business owner­­s who put themselves and their personalities into their marketing attract more customers than those who don’t.

Does the idea of self-promotion create a sickening feeling in your stomach? A lot of business owners are shy because they do­­n’t feel worthy of promotion. If you’re starting out in business and you are working out of your garage or at the kitchen table, it’s easy to assume no one wants to do business with you. It’s easy to undervalue your own skills. In response your first impulse is to create a big, fancy corporate name and to put up a website with an eye-catching logo. This is the opposite of what you should do.

Put your personality into your marketing and make your business look small. Customers love doing business with the owner, not some faceless corporation. Many of the most successful (and smart!) companies use a personality, or  individual, as the front person in order to build a relationship with customers.

Take for instance, the Wendy’s restaurant chain. Years ago, Wendy’s had a famous commercial campaign where a woman said, “Where’s the beef?” Funny as those commercials were in the 1980’s, and as well-known as they became, they did not generate sales for Wendy’s restaurants. The campaigns that outperformed those entertaining commercials were those featuring Dave Thomas, founder of Wendy’s. Each time Wendy’s introduced a special sandwich, Dave would go to the studio and shoot a commercial. Now, this was painful for Dave and everybody else involved. He had never performed in front of a camera. It took him dozens of takes just to say his name right. But Dave stuck with it because these commercials generated more customers than any other advertising approach.
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Feeling the Fear and Doing it Anyway

By: Kristen Moeller on: April 9th, 2010 11 Comments

How many times have we heard that courage isn’t the absence of fear? Courage is instead the ability to feel the fear and take action anyway. We say we know this but once the fear takes hold, our first response is a strong desire to have it go away.  So many people wait to take action until the fear goes away, or they use the sensation of fear as a reason not to do something. Often when I am working with clients on fulfilling their visions, I hear from them, “It (whatever it is) is causing me too much anxiety so I decided not to continue.”

What if the anxiety we felt around taking on new ventures and adventures was just part of the deal?  What if we really knew this?  To grow and stretch ourselves isn’t always comfortable and certainly isn’t easy.  That’s why there is a term for it – “growing pains.”

Although we don’t like to admit it, many of us back off from our goals at the first sign of discomfort.  Or we get through the first phase of discomfort and think, “Okay, that’s it.  I don’t have to go through that again.”  And when the next level of “growing pains” occurs, we stop.  We think, “I’ve already gone through this, I’m not doing it again” or even worse we think, “Maybe this is a sign that I shouldn’t be doing this.”

One of my strategies for dealing with fear is to take the conversation out of monologue and into dialogue – to take it out of my head and share it with my trusted advisors.  I have surrounded myself with people who are creating amazing things in their lives and the world and are not afraid to share the ups and downs.  A small group of us meet monthly and have the freedom to ask for support and vent our frustrations.  We leave feeling heard and connected.  Together we know we can achieve what we could not alone.

During the writing of my book, Waiting for Jack, there were many times I considered giving up.  Having never written a book before, at some of these points I wasn’t sure if the monologue I was having was the “truth.”  The thoughts went something like: “Maybe I am in over my head.  Maybe it’s not worth it.”  And then there were the rejections.  Agents who seemed interested then later said “no.”  I often found myself wondering if I should quit or if it was really worth it.

I persevered and it has been the ride of my life.  The ups and downs, the terror and joy have all been worth it.  After all, as they say, it’s the journey not the destination that really matters.

When fear arises, the question is: are you letting it stop you from creating what you want in life or are you going in a direction that no longer aligns with your purpose?  We all need to find the answer for ourselves.  There is nothing wrong with deciding half-way through that we are not on the right path and choosing a new direction.  But my wish for all of us is the courage to “fiercely disrupt the ordinary.”  That means the ordinary in the world and our own ordinary.  Be willing to get out of the comfort zone and live this one wild precious life.  Follow your dreams, whatever they are and feel the fear and do it anyway!

Kristen Moeller’s first book, Waiting for Jack: Confessions of a Self-Help Junkie: How to Stop Waiting and Start Living Your Life is available now.

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Be Your Own Santa Claus

By: Dan Kennedy on: November 30th, 2009 3 Comments

I am writing most of this on what is now – to me, inexplicably – called ‘Black Friday’, the day after Thanksgiving.

This year, some $400-Billion to $450-Billion will be spent on holiday shopping and holiday related purchases; travel, in spite of the recession, unemployment, etc. – booming; hard for me to see what’s “black” about it, in general.

Of course there are (always) people bringing up the rear economically, some chronically; others temporarily experiencing adversity; and I think I do my part for those in the latter group.

Locally, where I live, I contribute significantly to a ‘Baskets Of Hope’ privately run charity, that provides food, toys, clothing, etc. to needy families; I contribute to two food banks – I think everyone who can should, in some way, reach out to those with needs and difficulties.

Anyway, this was once a very special Friday, when it seemed everybody in this area trekked to downtown Cleveland, for the arrival of Santa at one department store, Mr. Jingaling at the other, tree lighting on Public Square.
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Entitlement vs. Initiative

By: Dan Kennedy on: October 5th, 2009 15 Comments

I have a particular philosophy about entitlement vs. initiative.

This has always kept me oriented toward self-help; towards resourcefulness; towards responsibility, thus providing me with an exceptional level of control. (Imperfect, but exceptional.)

I was in an Italian neighborhood recently. An old Cleveland neighborhood originally populated by Italian immigrants, still populated by a lot of first generation Italian immigrants as well as second generation families.

Plus a slight homogenous mix of everything else.

I walked through a Lowe’s store and a Walgreens. Saw no signs in Italian. But Lowes and Walgreen stores in many parts of the country now have signs in Spanish for Mexican immigrants. On the chains’ part, this is obviously smart marketing.
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The Renegade Millionaires’ Simple Litmus Test 

By: Dan Kennedy on: September 30th, 2009 36 Comments

The job site CareerBuilder.com reports that 1 in 5 employees admits to giving bogus reasons for coming to work late. Some of the best are:

  • I dreamed I was fired,so I slept in. When I woke up I realized I was dreaming so I hurried in.
  • I went all the way to the office before realizing I was still in my pajamas and had to go home to change. That took a while.
  • I saw you weren’t there, so I went out looking for you.

Well, this sort of thing is to be expected from employees. Bogus or not. But not from entrepreneurs. And never from Renegade Millionaire entrepreneurs.
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The Top Secret to Success They Don’t Want You To Know

By: Dan Kennedy on: September 29th, 2009 34 Comments

There is a tendency amongst authors writing about “success” as well as entrepreneurs, small business owners and CEO’s telling their success stories to be warm ‘n fuzzy and present classically popular ideas palatable to the largest number of people. To say that nice guys win. That having a positive attitude and drawing little smiley faces above the i’s you dot will not only endear you to people but actually attract prosperity.

In truth, there is little evidence of this. None of it is harmful in moderation, but it conceals fundamental truth about ultra-high achievers: they tend to be tough, intolerant, hard-driving, demanding, competitive people often viewed as difficult, mean and ruthless by others. And they tend to have a profound sense of superiority usually viewed as arrogance. It sometimes gets them in trouble, but it is also an essential factor in their success.
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3 Common Habits Of Successful Entrepreneurs

By: Bill Glazer on: September 14th, 2009 3 Comments

As you might imagine, with tens of thousands of GKIC Members and actually working first hand with nearly 200 people in Peak Performers, VIP-Mastermind, Info-MASTERMIND and my personal clients, I see a lot and learn a lot about Entrepreneurs. I was thinking the other day about the traits that the most successful ones have in common and I’ve identified the three most common ones.

HABIT #1: They READ a lot…especially books. In fact, when I first discovered “Planet Dan” way back in 1995 the first thing that I did when I figured out that this Direct Response stuff really works is to become a veracious reader. I first began with the classics like John Caples, Robert Collier, David Ogilvy, Gary Halbert and of course everything Dan Kennedy wrote.
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When Things Don’t Go As Planned

By: Dan Kennedy on: August 26th, 2009 11 Comments

The moral of Earl Nightingale’s greener pastures story is, nobody’s business or life is perfect, and the most perfect of another’s situations is rarely as good as it seems from afar.

It would be dangerous to trade, even with the person you might envy most, based only on observations from a distance. It’s usually better to work at making your own “house” better and more to your liking than to envy or swap for another.

Lately, most of my clients, coaching members and I have had most things going our way. We’re all pretty fat ‘n happy. Some of us are deluged with business, using shovel and wheelbarrow to handle the money.
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